NAME

ICC::Support::Chart - An object oriented module for reading, writing and manipulating color measurement data.

SYNOPSIS

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    # create a new object
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new(); # empty object
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($hash); # from a hash
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($array); # from an array
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($file_path); # from a file
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($folder_path); # from a folder

    # get/set header hash
    $hash = $chart->header();
    $hash = $chart->header($replace);

    # get/set data array
    $array = $chart->array();
    $array = $chart->array($replace);

    # get number of rows in data array
    $m = $chart->size();
    $m = $chart->size($flag);

    # get number of rows and columns in data array
    ($m, $n) = $chart->size();
    ($m, $n) = $chart->size($flag);

    # get row slice from list of SAMPLE_ID keys
    $rows = $chart->rows(@ids));

    # get column slice from list of DATA_FORMAT keys
    $cols = $chart->cols(@keys);

    # get format keys from column slice
    $keys = fmt_keys();
    $keys = fmt_keys($cols);

    # get/set column slice context
    $context = $chart->context($cols);
    $chart->context($cols, $context);

    # test for a data class
    @cols = $chart->test('CLASS'); # get array of indices
    @cols = $chart->test('CLASS', $context);
    $n = $chart->test('CLASS'); # get count of indices
    $n = $chart->test('CLASS', $context);

    # get/set keyword value(s)
    $array = $chart->keyword(); # get keyword/value array
    $value = $chart->keyword($key); # get first value
    @values = $chart->keyword($key); # get array of values
    @old = $chart->keyword($key, @values); # set array of values

    # get/set 'CREATED' value
    $time = $chart->created(); # get 'CREATED' value
    $time = $chart->created($string); # set 'CREATED' value
    $time = $chart->created($time); # set 'CREATED' value
    $time = $chart->created($value); # set 'CREATED' value

    # get/set data slice
    $mat = $chart->slice(); # get all row and columns
    $mat = $chart->slice($rows); # get specified rows, all columns
    $mat = $chart->slice($rows, $cols); # get specified rows and columns
    $cols = $chart->slice($rows, $cols, $replace); # set specified rows and columns

    # get/set colorimetry slice
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry(); # get all row and columns
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry($rows); # get specified rows, all columns
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry($rows, $cols); # get specified rows and columns
    $cols = $chart->colorimetry($rows, $cols, $replace); # set specified rows and columns

    # get/set SAMPLE_ID data slice
    $cols = $chart->id(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->id($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->id($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set SAMPLE_NAME data slice
    $cols = $chart->name(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->name($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->name($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set RGB data slice
    $cols = $chart->rgb(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->rgb($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->rgb($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set CMYK data slice
    $cols = $chart->cmyk(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->cmyk($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->cmyk($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set 6/C data slice
    $cols = $chart->hex(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->hex($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->hex($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set nCLR data slice
    $cols = $chart->nCLR(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->nCLR($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->nCLR($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set device data slice
    $cols = $chart->device(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->device($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->device($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set CTV data slice
    $cols = $chart->ctv(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->ctv($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->ctv($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set L*a*b* data slice
    $cols = $chart->lab(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->lab($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->lab($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set XYZ data slice
    $cols = $chart->xyz(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->xyz($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->xyz($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set density data slice
    $cols = $chart->density(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->density($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->density($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get/set spectral data slice
    $cols = $chart->spectral(); # get column slice
    $mat = $chart->spectral($rows); # get specified rows
    $cols = $chart->spectral($rows, $replace); # set specified rows

    # get spectral wavelength slice
    $nms = $chart->wavelength();

    # get spectral wavelength range
    $range = $chart->nm();

    # get illuminant white point
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt();
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt($hash);

    # get media white point
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt();
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt($hash);

    # get media black point
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt();
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt($hash);

    # get the OBA index
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index();
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index($hash);

    # get the M1/M2 XYZ vectors
    ($m1, $m2) = $chart->oba_index();
    ($m1, $m2) = $chart->oba_index($hash);

    # get chromatic adaptation transform object (CAT)
    $cat = $chart->cat();
    $cat = $chart->cat($hash);

    # get Color object
    $color = $chart->color();
    $color = $chart->color($hash);

    # add average sample
    $rows = $chart->add_avg($rows);

    # add format keys
    $cols = $chart->add_fmt(@keys);

    # add CTV data
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv();
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv($hash);

    # add L*a*b* data
    $cols = $chart->add_lab();
    $cols = $chart->add_lab($hash);

    # add XYZ data
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz();
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz($hash);

    # add density data
    $cols = $chart->add_density();
    $cols = $chart->add_density($hash);

    # add udf computed data
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($cols1, $cols2, ... $hash);

    # add date
    $cols = $chart->add_date();
    $cols = $chart->add_date($hash);

    # add data rows
    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat);
    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat, $cols);

    # add data columns
    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat);
    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat, $header);

    # add/remove data rows
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows();
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length, $mat);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length, $mat, $cols);

    # add/remove data columns
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols();
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length, $mat);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length, $mat, $rows);

    # remove data rows
    $removed_mat = $chart->remove_rows($rows);

    # remove data columns
    $removed_mat = $chart->remove_cols($cols);

    # get sample selection based on data values
    $rows = $chart->find($code_ref, $rows, $cols);

    # get sample selection based on device values
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref);
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, $source_rows);
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, $source_rows, $hash);

    # get sample selection based on L*a*b* values
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref);
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, $source_rows);
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, $source_rows, $hash);

    # get sample selection based on tokens
    $rows = $chart->select_token($string);
    $rows = $chart->select_token($string, $hash);

    # get sample selection based on 2-D location
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix();
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($row_length);
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($upper_row_index, $lower_row_index, $left_column_index, $right_column_index);
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($upper_row_index, $lower_row_index, $left_column_index, $right_column_index, $row_length);

    # get sample selection using template
    $mat = $chart->select_template($template);
    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, $hash);
    ($mat, $sid) = $chart->select_template($template);
    ($mat, $sid) = $chart->select_template($template, $hash);

    # get randomized sample selection
    $rows = $chart->randomize();
    $rows = $chart->randomize($rows);

    # analyze chart device values
    $struct = $chart->anaylze();
    $struct = $chart->anaylze($rows);
    $struct = $chart->anaylze($rows, $hash);

    # write chart to CGATS ASCII file
    $chart->write($file_path);
    $chart->write($file_path, $rows);
    $chart->write($file_path, $rows, $cols);

    # write chart to CxF3 file
    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path);
    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path, $rows);
    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path, $rows, $cols);

    # write chart to delimited ASCII file
    $chart->writeASCII($file_path);
    $chart->writeASCII($file_path, $rows);
    $chart->writeASCII($file_path, $rows, $cols);

    # write chart to TIFF file
    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path);
    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path, $rows);
    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path, $rows, $cols);

    # write chart to Adobe Swatch Exchange (.ase) file
    $chart->writeASE($file_path, $rows, $cols);
    $chart->writeASE($file_path, $rows, $cols, $color_type);

    # Math::Matrix methods for row_matrix manipulation

    # rotate matrix
    $mat = $mat->rotate($n);

    # flip matrix
    $mat = $mat->flip($n);

    # randomize matrix
    $mat = $mat->randomize();

DESCRIPTION

Color measurements are made with a spectrophotometer and saved as a file. An ICC::Support::Chart object is made from this measurement file. Other ICC modules and objects utilize Chart objects for data input and output. Many methods are provided for converting, combining, arranging, selecting and writing the Chart object data.

Object structure

An ICC::Support::Chart object is a blessed array reference. The array contains five elements, the object header, the chart data, the colorimetry data, the header line data, and the SAMPLE_ID hash.

    # create empty Chart object
    my $self = [
        {},     # header hash
        [[]],   # data array
        [[]],   # colorimetry array
        [],     # header line array
        {},     # SAMPLE_ID hash
    ];

The header hash contains metadata describing the object. The origin of the object determines the content of the hash. Here are some common hash keys.

    $self->[0]{'file_path'} is the 'new' method file path
    $self->[0]{'file_type'} is the 'new' method file type
    $self->[0]{'files_read'} is the number of files read (and averaged) when the file path is a folder
    $self->[0]{'read_rs'} is the record separator (LF, CR or CRLF) detected by the 'new' method
    $self->[0]{'write_rs'} is the record separator (LF, CR or CRLF) output by the 'write' method

    $self->[0]{'CxF3_dom'} is the root node of the CxF3 XML object (CxF3 files)
    $self->[0]{'xrp:CustomAttributes'} is a hash of the 'xrp:CustomAttributes' Names/Values (CxF3 files)

    $self->[0]{'TIFF_tag'} is a hash containing the TIFF directory (TIFF files)
    $self->[0]{'TIFF_tag'}{'700'} is the XMP metadata packet (Photoshop TIFF files)

    $self->[0]{'illuminant'} is an array containing illuminant spectral data
    $self->[0]{'CIS_shift'} is the CIE color mixture shift

The data array is a 2-D array or matrix whose rows are the samples, and whose columns are the data fields. The first row contains the field names, and is equivalent to a header row in a spreadsheet. Permissible field names are enumerated in the ANSI standard CGATS.17 and ISO standard 28178. The remaining rows are the chart data, with the array index corresponding to the sample number.

    $self->[1][0][$j] is the DATA_FORMAT field name for column $j
    $self->[1][$i][$j] is data for sample $i, column $j, first sample $i = 1

The colorimetry array is a 2-D array or matrix whose columns correspond to the chart data. The array contains the colorimetric origin of XYZ and L*a*b* data, and the media white and black points. There are five rows, whose contents depend on the field type.

    for spectral columns:
    spectral data has no colorimetric properties.
    the measuring illuminant may be indicated by the ISO identifiers M0, M1, M2 or M3.

    for XYZ or LAB columns:
    $self->[2][0][$j] is origin (column slice)
    $self->[2][1][$j] is 'Color.pm' object for column $j (if origin is spectral data)
    $self->[2][2][$j] is illuminant XYZ for column $j -OR- CAT object for column $j
    $self->[2][3][$j] is media white point XYZ for column $j
    $self->[2][4][$j] is media black point XYZ for column $j
    $self->[2][5][$j] is ColorSpecification XML for column $j (CxF3)
    $self->[2][6][$j] is hash containing colorimetry parameters

    for density columns:
    $self->[2][0][$j] is origin (column slice)
    $self->[2][1][$j] is 'Color.pm' object for column $j (if origin is spectral data)

    for CTV columns:
    $self->[2][0][$j] is origin (column slice)
    $self->[2][3][$j] is media white CTV (0) for column $j

In a CGATS ASCII file, the header lines are those preceding the 'BEGIN_DATA_FORMAT' line. Lines begin with a keyword. Lines after the first contain a value, separated from the keyword by whitespace. Values are generally enclosed in double quotes.

    $self->[3][$i][0] is the keyword of header line $i
    $self->[3][$i][1] is the value of header line $i
    $self->[3][$i][2] is the CxF3 source of header line $i

In a CxF3 file, the header lines are mapped to/from the 'FileInformation' element or a 'ColorSpecification' element. The mapping depends on the content of the keyword/value. When a CxF3 file is read, the source of the keyword/value line is saved. When a CxF3 file is written, the keyword/value lines are written to the source location. If the source is undefined (as when reading from a CGATS ASCII file), most keyword/values are not written to the CxF3 file. An optional hash may be used to force keyword/values to be written as 'Tag' elements in the 'FileInformation' element.

The SAMPLE_ID hash is a lookup table with the SAMPLE_ID as keys and the chart data index as values. The hash is created by the 'new' method, and other methods that add or remove data rows. The hash is used by the 'rows' method to make a row slice from a list of SAMPLE_IDs. If there are two or more rows with the same SAMPLE_ID, the hash will contain the largest index. If there is no SAMPLE_ID data, the hash is empty.

    $self->[4]{'key'} is data row index of SAMPLE_ID 'key'

Test charts

A color device is characterized by scanning, printing or displaying a test chart. The test chart should contain the full range of colors possible with that device. The number of possible colors is usually very large, so we choose a practical subset — large enough to obtain an accurate characterization, but small enough to be measured easily.

The IT8.7/4 data set, defined by the ANSI/CGATS standards group, is a common set of test chart colors for a CMYK printer. This data set contains 1617 samples, specified by their CMYK values and an ID value. The test samples are normally printed as a chart containing small, square patches arranged in a rectangular grid. A graphic arts spectrophotometer has the ability to measure these patches automatically via X-Y movement of the chart and/or the measuring head. The number of samples in the IT8.7/4 data set (1617) comes from the maximum chart size of a common spectrophotometer — 33 rows by 49 columns.

When a test chart is measured, the instrument will read it like we read a page, line-by-line. Depending on the design of the instrument and its software, the lines may be chart rows or columns. The measurements are stored as a list, in the order they are read. So, although the chart is two-dimensional, the data list is one-dimensional. The location of a chart sample may be saved as metadata, or it may be inferred from an ID value or from the chart dimensions.

File formats

A test chart measurement file will usually contain device data and associated measurements for each patch or sample. For instance, the file might contain CMYK values and spectral reflectance measurements. But sometimes the file only contains measurements, and no device data. For instance, paint chips have no device values, just color names. Obviously, we need a flexible file format to handle these various needs.

The file format most often used to store measurement data is whitespace-delimited ASCII, as saved from spreadsheet software. The data samples are rows, and the fields are columns in the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet also contains information about the test, and lines to group the field names and data. The structure of these text files, and the allowed field names are defined by parallel ANSI and ISO standards (see CGATS.17 and ISO 28178).

In 2004, the CGATS group began work on an equivalent XML file format. In those days, it was believed that XML would simplify software development, and ease the integration of systems. A version of CGATS.17 was released in 2005 containing the ASCII format, and its XML equivalent. Unfortunately, this XML design was technically flawed and never used commercially. In the same time period, the Gretag-Macbeth company introduced a proprietary XML format called CxF, which was implemented in some of their color management software. Gretag-Macbeth was purchased by X-Rite, which released improved versions of CxF, known as CxF2 and CxF3. CxF3 was recently adopted by the ISO standards group as CxF/X, and is the default file format for X-Rite's i1Profiler software.

The ICC::Support::Chart module was originally developed to support CGATS ASCII files. Support for CxF3 files was added later, and required substantial modifications, the most prominent being the addition of "Contexts" to the format fields. ICC::Support::Chart objects can be created from either format, and saved in either format, with some limitations. The CxF3 files written by this software are intended to be compatible with X-Rite's i1Profiler software.

Colorimetry

The colorimetry array is used to store colorimetric metadata. For example, when we add XYZ data to a chart containing spectral data, the illuminant and the CIE observer are specified. A 'Color.pm' object is created from these parameters, and used to convert the spectral data to XYZ. A reference to this object is stored in the colorimetry array. If additional samples of spectral data are supplied, their XYZ values may be computed using this object. We also store the illuminant white point, and the chromatic adaptation transform, if used.

If the chart contains XYZ and device data, we may be able to compute the media white point and black point. These values are computed on demand, and stored in the colorimetry array.

When L*a*b* and CTV values are computed from XYZ values, the column slice of the XYZ data is stored in the colorimetry array. We refer to this as the origin of the added data.

The columns of the colorimetry array correspond to those of the data array. In effect, the colorimetry array is an extension of the data array for storage of the metadata. This structure allows the possibility of XYZ/L*a*b* data of different illuminants within the same Chart object.

See the object structure section above for details of what is stored for each field type. There are instances when we do not know the colorimetry metadata. In the colorimetry is unknown, we assume D50 illumination, CIE 2° observer, which is the ICC standard. Some field types (e.g. device data) do not use the colorimetry array and will contain 'undef' values.

Slices

In this document, a slice refers to an array of row or column indices. For example,

    $rows = [1, 2, 3]; # rows 1, 2 and 3
    $rows = [1 .. 100]; # rows 1 to 100
    $rows = [50, 22, 34, 3]; # rows in no particular order

The term slice comes from Perl, where a slice accesses several elements of a list, an array, or a hash simultaneously using a list of subscripts. The Perl concept of slices is one-dimensional, but we have extended it to two-dimensions. (See the 'perldata' language reference for a more detailed explanation of slices).

Note that while we say a slice is an array of indices, it is technically a reference to an array of indices. For the sake of clarity, we omit the phrase 'reference to an' in most of this document. (See the 'perldata' language reference for a more detailed explanation of arrays and references).

Many methods use row and column slices as parameters to select a subset of the data.

    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 10], [0 .. 4]);

will return a matrix containing rows 1 - 10, columns 0 - 4, a subset of the larger data array.

Most methods interpret the empty slice to mean all rows or columns in that object.

    $mat = $chart->slice([], [0 .. 4]);

will return a matrix containing all rows, columns 0 - 4.

Furthermore, most methods flatten the slice, which means reducing an array structure to a simple array.

    $mat = $chart->slice([[1, 2, 3], 4, [5, 6], 7, 8], [0 .. 4]);

will return a matrix containing rows 1 - 8, columns 0 - 4.

Because slices are flattened, it is possible to use a matrix as a slice parameter.

    $row_matrix = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]];
    $mat = $chart->slice($row_matrix, [0 - 4]);

will return a matrix containing rows 1 - 9, columns 0 - 4.

We can define the layout of a 2-D chart by arranging the patch row indices in a matrix. Commonly used row matrices may be created using the "select_matrix" and "select_template" methods. A row matrix may be modified using the additional Math::Matrix methods provided by this module, "rotate", "flip" and "randomize".

Contexts

The structure of a chart as a two-dimensional table originated at Kodak, where measurements of Q-60 test targets were entered into a spreadsheet, then saved in tab-delimited text format for distribution to users. The ICC::Support::Chart module was originally developed around this data structure. Now, there is a corresponding XML format called CxF3 (see "File formats"), and we have adapted the module to support this format, in addition to the text format.

The CxF3 format does not use the simple two-dimensional table structure. It does support the concept of sample collections, but even with that, the representation of spectral data ends up just a list of numbers. There are many difficulties reading and writing CxF3 files. A big problem is keeping track of the 'ObjectType' attribute, which may be different for each object in a collection. This led to modification of the format fields to include an optional prefix which we call the context. If a chart object was created from a CxF3 file, the contexts of the format fields are the 'ObjectType' attributes.

Format fields for RGB data without context,

    RGB_R, RGB_G, RGB_B

Format fields for RGB data with 'Target' context ('ObjectType' from CxF3 file),

    Target|RGB_R, Target|RGB_G, Target|RGB_B

The character '|' was chosen because it cannot be used in an XML attribute, and is not used in the standard CGATS field names.

Many methods allow the context to be specified through an optional hash. For example,

    $rgb = $chart->rgb([], {'context' => 'Target'});
    $M0_spectral = $chart->spectral([], {'context' => 'M0_Measurement'});
    $M2_spectral = $chart->spectral([], {'context' => 'M2_Measurement'});

To simplify and improve compatibility of scripts with CxF3 data, it is not strictly necessary to specify contexts. Here are examples to illustrate the behavior of methods that allow contexts,

    $chart1 = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1_CGATS.txt'); # no contexts in this chart

    $cmyk = $chart1->cmyk(); # returns slice for CMYK data – context is undefined
    $cmyk = $chart1->cmyk({'context' => undef}); # context is explicitly undefined – same as above
    $cmyk = $chart1->cmyk({'context' => 'Target'}) # returns 'undef' because there is no data with that context

    $chart2 = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL_2006_Coated_1.mxf'); # i1Profiler CxF3 format has contexts

    $cmyk = $chart2->cmyk(); # returns slice for CMYK data – context is undefined, so it is ignored
    $cmyk = $chart2->cmyk({'context' => 'Target'}) # returns slice for CMYK data, which has this ObjectType in .mxf files
    $cmyk = $chart2->cmyk({'context' => 'Source'}) # returns 'undef' because there is no data with that context

This behavior is implemented by the following algorithm. A hash is built from the format field names including their contexts. The fields we are seeking (with context, if supplied) are looked up in the hash. If successful, that slice is used. If not, the hash is rebuilt from the format field names without contexts. The fields we are seeking are looked up in the new hash. If successful, that slice is used. If not, the method returns 'undef'. A consequence of the hash lookup technique is that duplicate field names are resolved to the last occurrence when building the hash. So, if we have duplicate field names, the slice will contain the largest column index for that field name.

Although the addition of contexts was motivated by the CxF3 format, there are some other benefits. For instance, we may wish to have XYZ data with different illuminants in the same chart. To accommodate this need, some methods allow both the source and destination context to be specified,

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_spectral_data.txt');

    $D50 = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'D50', 'added' => 'D50_illum'}); # add XYZ data with D50 illuminant
    $F11 = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'F11', 'added' => 'F11_illum'}); # add XYZ data with F11 illuminant

This chart now contains spectral data and two sets of XYZ data. The 'added' key sets the context of the new XYZ fields, which may be used to distinguish them in subsequent operations. The 'context' key may be used to select the source data,

    $D50_from_M0 = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'D50', 'context' => 'M0_Measurement', 'added' => 'D50_from_M0'});

The context of format fields may be set directly using the 'context' method,

    $chart->context($D50, 'CIE_D50');

When writing to a text file, contexts are removed from the field names. This may result in a file with duplicate field names. So, if contexts are used, it is best to be explicit,

    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_ambiguous_data.txt); # writes everything, including all sets of XYZ data
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_D50_data.txt, [], $D50); # writes only the D50 XYZ data

METHODS

Creating ICC::Support::Chart objects

new

This method creates an ICC::Support::Chart object.

With no parameters, the object contains the empty basic structure (see "Object structure").

An object may be created from a hash, with parameters describing a patch set. Hash keys are 'colorspace', 'template' and 'sort'.

An object may be created from a 2-D array, with the first row containing the format keys, followed by the sample data in the remaining rows.

Most often, an object is created from a data file. Supported files types are CGATS ASCII, CxF3, TIFF, SpectraShop SS3, and Adobe Swatch Exchange. The file type is determined from the internal structure of the file, not from the suffix. For more information on files types, read the SEE ALSO section of this document.

An object may be created from a single file, or from a folder (directory) of files. If the files within a folder have an identical structure, they may be averaged. If the files within a folder have the same format fields, they may by appended.

An optional hash may added to provide supplementary parameters. Supported hash keys for folders are 'folder', 'method'

Usage

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new(); # empty object
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($hash); # from a hash
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($array); # from an array
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($file_path); # from a single file
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($folder_path); # from a folder of files
    ($chart, $result) = ICC::Support::Chart->new( ... ); # get object and result

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new(); # make empty object

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new({'colorspace' => 'RGB', 'template' => [[([0, 127, 255]) x 3]], 'sort' => [3, 1, 2]}); # make object from hash (see note 11)

    $array = [[qw(SAMPLE_ID RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B)], [1, 255, 255, 255], [2, 255, 255, 128], [3, 255, 255, 0]]; # data array (with format header)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($array); # make object from data array (see note 4)
    $array = [[1, 255, 255, 255], [2, 255, 255, 128], [3, 255, 255, 0]]; # data array (no format header)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new($array, {'format' => [qw(SAMPLE_ID RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B)]}); # make object from data array (see note 4)

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt'); # CGATS ASCII file (see note 13)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf'); # CxF3 file
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf', {'cc:Tag' => [qw(Target/SampleID)]}); # import SampleID Tags
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf', {'cc:Object' => [qw(Target/Id)]}); # import Target Id
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf', {'validate' => 1});  # validate to CxF3 schema
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_profile.icc'); # ICC profile (see note 9)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif'); # TIFF file (see note 5)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22}); # divide image into 12 rows and 22 columns (see note 6)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22, 'crop' => [10, 10, 10, 10]}); # crop 10 pixels on all sides
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22, 'ratio' => 0.7}); # sample is 0.7 x division size
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22, 'aperture' => 4.5}); # sample is 4.5 mm aperture
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22, 'context' => 'scanner'}); # set format context
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'rows' => 12, 'columns' => 22, 'udf' => $udf, 'format' => $fmt}); # user defined function
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_scan.tif', {'aperture' => 4.5}); # special sampling mode (see note 7)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_swatches.ase'); # Adobe Swatch Exchange file (see note 8)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_swatches.ase', {'colorspace' => 'CMYK'}); # Adobe Swatch Exchange file

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder'); # files are averaged (see note 2)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'folder' => 'AVG'}); # same as above
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'method' => 'SIMPLE'}); # use simple averaging for L*a*b* and density
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'folder' => 'APPEND'}); # files are appended (see note 3)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'STDEV_LAB' => undef}); # files are averaged, with standard deviation (see note 12)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'STDEV_LAB' => [qw(M0 M2)]}); # same as above, 'M0' and 'M2' prefixes (see note 12)
    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_folder', {'STDEV_LAB' => [qw(M0 M2)], 'illuminant' => 'F2'}); # same as above, with 'F2' illuminant (see note 12)

    ($chart, $result) = ICC::Support::Chart->new({}); # get result of 'new' method (see note 10)
  1. File paths are processed with the File::Glob::bsd_glob function on Unix systems.

  2. Files must have the same row and column structure to be averaged.

  3. Files must have the same column structure to be appended.

  4. The supplied array is copied to the object, making them independent entities.

  5. Supported file types are RGB, CMYK, or L*a*b*, 8, 16 or 32 bit, Intel or Motorola byte order, uncompressed. Alpha and spot channels are supported in RGB and CMYK files. With no parameters, each pixel becomes a data sample.

  6. Supported hash keys are 'rows', 'columns', 'crop', 'ratio', 'aperture', 'udf' and 'format'. The 'rows' and 'columns' parameters specify the size of the chart, with the image size in pixels as default values. The 'crop' parameter is an array containing the crop dimension in pixels for the left, right, upper and lower edges. The 'ratio' and 'aperture' parameters control the size of the sample rectangle. The 'ratio' value must be between 0 and 1, with a default value of 0.5. If the 'ratio' is set to 0, the sample size is one pixel, located in the middle of the image division for that sample. The 'aperture' parameter is the diameter of a circle in millimeters, and the sample rectangle is set to a square of the same area. The 'aperture' parameter overrides the 'ratio' parameter. The 'udf' parameter is a code reference of a user defined function which processes each sample pixel individually. The 'format' parameter sets the format of the fields, and overrides the TIFF format.

  7. When the 'aperture' key is specified, and the 'rows' and 'columns' keys are not, the sample matrix is a uniformly spaced grid of single-pixel samples equal in total area to the circular aperture.

  8. An Adobe Swatch Exchange file may contain LAB, RGB, CMYK or Gray swatches, which are filtered using the 'colorspace' parameter.

  9. Supported profile types are i1Profiler, ProfileMaker, MonacoPROFILER, EFI, Heidelberg and Argyll.

  10. The result is undefined on success, and contains an error message on failure. The object may still be usable on failure, depending on the circumstances.

  11. A patch set is created from a hash parameter. Supported hash keys are: 'colorspace', 'template', 'sort' and 'limit'. Supported colorspaces are 'RGB', 'CMYK', 'nCLR' and 'Lab'. The template value is a 3-D array describing the chart structure. The sort value is a 1-D array containing the sort columns (one-based), each preceeded by an optional '-' to indicate descending order. The limit is the total ink limit, using the Monaco algorithm to select patches.

  12. When a folder of files is averaged, ISO 28178 statistics may be enabled with a hash parameter. Supported hash keys are: 'STDEV_XYZ', 'STDEV_LAB', 'MEAN_DE', and 'CHI_SQD_PAR'. The hash key values are the context prefix(es) of the source data. A context prefix of undef indicates no prefix. Multiple context prefixes are placed in an array. XYZ and L*a*b* data are added as needed, and hash keys for 'add_xyz' and 'add_lab' may be used.

  13. If a CGATS ASCII file contains the 'DPLGROTATE' and/or 'DPLGFLIP' keywords, the chart will be rotated and/or flipped (in that order) when read. The values for these keywords are the same as for the "rotate" and "flip" methods. The 'LGOROWLENGTH' keyword is also required, and may be updated to reflect the new orientation of the chart.

General accessors

This method returns a reference to the header hash (see "Object structure").

Usage

    $hash = $chart->header(); # get header hash
    $hash = $chart->header($replacement_hash); # set header hash

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt'); # create a chart object
    $hash = $chart->header(); # get header hash
    $rs = $chart->header->{'read_rs'}; # get file record separator
    $chart->header->{'write_rs'} = "\n"; # set file record separator
    $hash = $chart->header({'key' => 'value'}); # set header hash (see note 1)
  1. The parameter is copied to the object.

array

This method returns a reference to the data array (see "Object structure").

Usage

    $array = $chart->array(); # get data array
    $array = $chart->array($replacement_array); # set data array

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt'); # create a chart object
    $array = $chart->array(); # get data array
    $row = $chart->array->[0]; # get row 0 (format keys)
    $row = $chart->array->[1]; # get row 1 (first data sample)
    $row = $chart->array->[1][3]; # get data element, row 1, column 3
    $chart->array->[1] = [1, 2, 3, 4]; # set row 1
    $chart->array->[1][3] = 1.234; # set data element, row 1, column 3
    $rep = [[qw(SAMPLE_ID RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B)], [1, 255, 255, 255], [2, 255, 255, 128], [3, 255, 255, 0]];
    $chart->array($rep); # set data array (see note 1)
  1. Object data array is a copy of the supplied array parameter

size

This method returns the size of the chart. In the scalar context, this is the number of rows. In the array context, this is the number of rows and columns. The first row of the data array contains the format keys, and is not counted in the number of rows.

Usage

    $m = $chart->size(); # get number of rows ($m) in data array (see note 1)
    $m = $chart->size($flag); # returns initial size if flag is true (see note 3)
    ($m, $n) = $chart->size(); # get number of rows ($m) and columns ($n) in data array (see notes 1 and 2)
    ($m, $n) = $chart->size($flag); # returns initial size if flag is true (see note 3)
  1. Doesn't include row 0, which contains the format keys

  2. The size of an empty object is 0 rows and 0 columns

  3. The initial size (as stored in the header hash) is returned, if the flag is true.

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $m = $chart->size();
    print "chart has $m rows\n";
    ($m, $n) = $chart->size();
    print "chart has $m rows and $n columns\n";
    print "IT874\n" if ($chart->size() == 1617);

matrix_size

This method returns the size of the full row matrix, as returned by the 'select_matrix' method.

Usage

    $m = $chart->matrix_size(); # get number of rows ($m) in data matrix
    ($m, $n) = $chart->matrix_size(); # get number of rows ($m) and columns ($n) in data matrix

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $m = $chart->matrix_size();
    print "chart has $m rows\n";
    ($m, $n) = $chart->matrix_size();
    print "chart has $m rows and $n columns\n";

rows

This method returns a row slice from a list of SAMPLE_ID keys. The SAMPLE_ID is usually an integer, however any text string may be used.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->rows(@list); # make row slice from list of SAMPLE_ID keys

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $rows = $chart->rows(100, 102, 77, 55); # get row slice (see note 1)
  1. If any SAMPLE_ID in list is missing, or chart has no SAMPLE_ID field, returns 'undef'

cols

This method returns a column slice from a list of DATA_FORMAT keys. The keys are usually as specified in CGATS.17 or ISO 28178, however any text string may be used. The '|' character is used to separate the context prefix from base key.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->cols(@list); make column slice from list of DATA_FORMAT keys

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->cols(qw(CMYK_C CMYK_M CMYK_Y CMYK_K)); # get CMYK slice (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $cols = $chart->cols(qw(Target|CMYK_C Target|CMYK_M Target|CMYK_Y Target|CMYK_K)); # with context prefix
  1. If any FORMAT_KEY in list is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. An exact match to the format keys is attempted, and if that fails, a match to the format keys without their context is attempted

  3. Normally, objects made from CxF3 files will have context prefixes. If you call this method without using context prefixes, the first instances of the format keys (ignoring prefixes) will be returned.

fmt_keys

This method returns an array of format keys from a column slice. The returned keys will include the context prefix and separator, if any.

Usage

    $keys = $chart->fmt_keys(); # make array of all DATA_FORMAT keys
    $keys = $chart->fmt_keys($column_slice); # make array of DATA_FORMAT keys from column slice

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $keys = $chart->fmt_keys(); # get all format keys
    $keys = $chart->fmt_keys(1, 2, 3); # get selected format keys
    $cols = $chart->cols($keys); # returns [1, 2, 3]
    $cols = $chart->cols(qw(CMYK_C CMYK_M CMYK_Y CMYK_K)); # get CMYK slice
    $keys = $chart->fmt_keys($cols); # returned keys might have context prefix (see 'cols' note 2, above)

context

This method gets the prefix of a column slice (not including the '|' separator). In a scalar context, the prefix of the first key is returned. In an array context, the prefixes of each key are returned.

This method sets the prefix of a column slice to a supplied value. An array containing the modified DATA_FORMAT keys is returned. If the supplied value is 'undef', all prefixes (including the '|' separator) are removed.

Usage

    $context = $chart->context($column_slice); # get context of column slice (scalar)
    @context = $chart->context($column_slice); # get context of column slice (array)
    $keys = $chart->context($column_slice, 'my_prefix'); # set context of column slice
    $keys = $chart->context($column_slice, undef); # remove context of column slice

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->cmyk(); # get CMYK column slice
    $context = $chart->context($cols); # get scalar context of slice (see note 1 and 2)
    @context = $chart->context($cols); # get array of context values (see note 1 and 3)
    $keys = $chart->context($cols, 'Target'); # set context of column slice (see note 4)
    $keys = $chart->context($cols, undef); # remove context from column slice (see notes 4 and 5)
  1. Returns undef if the column has no context prefix

  2. Returns context of first column, and warns if other columns have a different context

  3. Returns an array containing the context of each column

  4. Returns an array reference containing the modified keys

  5. A context value of undef will remove the context prefix of all columns

test

This method returns a list of fields (columns) of a specified class. In a scalar context, returns the number of fields, which will be zero if no fields are found.

Without the optional context parameter, all fields of a specified class are counted. When the context is specified, only fields with that context are counted. When the context is specified as '|', only fields with no context are counted.

Usage

    @cols = $chart->test('CLASS'); # test for data of class (see notes 1 and 3)
    @cols = $chart->test('CLASS', $context); # with context
    $n = $chart->test('CLASS'); # test for data of class (see notes 2 and 3)
    $n = $chart->test('CLASS', $context); # with context

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    @cols = $chart->test('RGB'); # test for RGB data
    @cols = $chart->test('CMYK'); # test for CMYK data
    @cols = $chart->test('XYZ'); # test for XYZ data
    @cols = $chart->test('XYY'); # test for xyY data
    @cols = $chart->test('LAB'); # test for L*a*b* data
    @cols = $chart->test('LCH'); # test for L*C*h data
    @cols = $chart->test('NCLR'); # test for nCLR data (see note 4)
    @cols = $chart->test('SPECTRAL'); # test for spectral data (see note 5)
    @cols = $chart->test('SPOT'); # test for spot color data
    @cols = $chart->test('DENSITY'); # test for density data
    @cols = $chart->test('STDEVXYZ'); # test for XYZ standard deviation data
    @cols = $chart->test('STDEVLAB'); # test for L*a*b* standard deviation data
    @cols = $chart->test('ID'); # test for SAMPLE_ID data
    @cols = $chart->test('NAME'); # test for SAMPLE_NAME data
    @cols = $chart->test('DEVICE'); # test for RGB, CMYK or nCLR data
    @cols = $chart->test('RGB', 'Target'); # test for RGB data with 'Target' context prefix
    @cols = $chart->test('RGB', '|'); # test for RGB data with no context prefix
    print "contains RGB data\n" if ($chart->test('RGB') == 3);
  1. Returns array containing the matching columns

  2. Returns the number of matching columns (0 if none)

  3. Format keys for most data classes are defined in ANSI CGATS.17, ISO 28178, and ISO 17972-1 standards

  4. Format keys for nCLR devices were introduced in Gretag-Macbeth ProfileMaker software

  5. Format keys for spectral data were not clearly defined in standards, so there are several notations in use

keyword

This method gets/sets the keyword/value lines of a CGATS ASCII chart. The keywords, and their usage is described in CGATS.17/ISO 28178. A keyword may appear more than once with different values, so the value parameter is an array. Values may be strings or integers. String values must begin and end with the double quote character. When setting values, double quotes are added, if necessary.

The keyword/value lines are stored in a 2-D array. When a chart is saved in CGATS/ASCII format, this array is output as the file header. Lines with the keywords 'NUMBER_OF_FIELDS' and 'NUMBER_OF_SETS' are skipped.

The keyword method may be called in either a scalar or array context. In a scalar context, the first value is returned, and in an array context, all values are returned. If no lines with the keyword are found, no values are returned.

When setting values, the new values provided will replace the current values, starting at the beginning of the array. The lines will remain in their current position. If there are more values than current lines, new lines are added to the end of the array. When setting values, the current (old) values are returned.

If the keyword is enclosed in angle brackets, all lines with that keyword will be removed from the array. When setting values, the current lines are all removed, then lines with the new values are added to the end of the array.

Usage

    $array = $chart->keyword(); # get keyword/value array
    $value = $chart->keyword($key); # get first value
    @values = $chart->keyword($key); # get array of values
    @old = $chart->keyword($key, @values); # set array of values

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $array = $chart->keyword(); # get keyword/value array reference
    for (@{$array}) {print "@{$_}\n"}; print "\n";
    $std = $chart->keyword->[0][0]; # get first array element (see note 1)
    print "standard: $std\n\n";
    $date = $chart->keyword('CREATED'); # get a single value
    print "created: $date\n\n";
    @values = $chart->keyword('KEYWORD'); # get multiple values
    print "values: @values\n\n";
    $chart->keyword('MYROWLENGTH', 33); # add new array element
    for (@{$array}) {print "@{$_}\n"}; print "\n";
    $old = $chart->keyword('MYROWLENGTH', 22); # change value of existing array element
    for (@{$array}) {print "@{$_}\n"}; print "\n";
    $old = $chart->keyword('<MYROWLENGTH>'); # delete an array element
    for (@{$array}) {print "@{$_}\n"}; print "\n";
    @old = $chart->keyword('<KEYWORD>', qw(word1 word2 word3)); # delete, then add multiple keyword/values
    for (@{$array}) {print "@{$_}\n"}; print "\n";
    print "removed values: @old\n"; # print removed values
  1. This line should contain the standard. Some common values are 'ISO28178', 'CGATS.17', 'ISO12642', 'IT8.7/4'. There is no value - just the keyword.

created

This method gets/sets the value of the keyword 'CREATED', which is the date/time that the chart was created. ISO 28178 specifies the format CCYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss[Z | +/-hh:mm] for this value. Most CGATS ASCII files do not conform to this standard, and use a different date/time format. The FreeBSD strptime() function of the Time::Piece module is used to parse these varied date/time formats. When getting the date/time, this method will return a Time::Piece object. When setting the date/time, the parameter may be a string, or a Time::Piece object. If the date/time string cannot be interpreted, localtime is used instead.

Usage

    $time = $chart->created(); # get 'CREATED' value as Time::Piece object
    $time = $chart->created($string); # set 'CREATED' value from text string
    $time = $chart->created($time); # set 'CREATED' value from Time::Piece object
    $time = $chart->created($value); # set 'CREATED' value from Unix date/time value

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $time = $chart->created(); # get the creation date/time as a Time::Piece object
    print $chart->keyword('CREATED'), " $time\n";
    $time = $chart->created('January 1, 2000 5:03 PM'); # set creation date/time using a text string
    print $chart->keyword('CREATED'), " $time\n";
    $time = $chart->created(scalar(localtime())); # set creation date/time using a Time::Piece object
    print $chart->keyword('CREATED'), " $time\n";
    $time = $chart->created(1400000000); # set creation date/time using a Unix date/time value
    print $chart->keyword('CREATED'), " $time\n";

    print "@{$time}\n"; # print Time::Piece object contents
    $string = $time->strftime('%Y-%m-%dT%T%z'); # format using 'C' strftime function
    substr($string, -2, 0, ':'); # add colon
    print "$string\n"; # print in ISO 8601 format, as specified by ISO 28178

slice

This method gets a data array slice, which is returned as a Math::Matrix object. The data array slice is specified by row and column slices, which are arrays of indices. For a more detailed explanation, see the Slices section, above.

When no parameters are provided, the entire data array is returned.

When only a row slice is provided, all fields (columns) are returned.

This method sets a region of the data array when replacement data is provided. The data array region is specified by row and column slices. When setting, the column slice is returned.

Data may be undefined when getting or setting, and there is no encoding of values.

Usage

    $mat = $chart->slice(); # get data array slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->slice($row_slice); # get data array slice (see note 2)
    $mat = $chart->slice($row_slice, $column_slice); # get data array slice (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->slice($row_slice, $column_slice, $replacement_array); # set data array slice (see note 3)

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $mat = $chart->slice(); # get all data (see note 4)
    $mat = $chart->slice([]); # same as above (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->slice([], []); # same as above (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 3]); # get rows 1 - 3, all columns
    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 3], []); # same as above
    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 3], [5 ..7]); # get rows 1 - 3, columns 5 - 7
    $mat = $chart->slice([1, 3, 5], [7, 5, 6]); # get rows 1, 3, 5, columns 7, 5, 6
    $rep = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]];
    $cols = $chart->slice([1 .. 3], [5 ..7], $rep); # set rows 1 - 3, columns 5 - 7
  1. A data array slice is a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  2. Row and column slices are 1-D arrays of indices

  3. Replacement array slice must be the size indicated by the row and column slices

  4. Doesn't include row 0, which contains the format keys

  5. An empty array [] indicates all rows or columns

colorimetry

This method gets a colorimetry array slice, which is returned as a Math::Matrix object. The colorimetry array slice is specified by row and column slices, which are arrays of indices. For a more detailed explanation, see the Slices section, above.

When no parameters are provided, the entire colorimetry array is returned.

When only a row slice is provided, all fields (columns) are returned.

This method sets a region of the colorimetry array when replacement data is provided. The colorimetry array region is specified by row and column slices. When setting, the column slice is returned.

Usage

    $mat = $chart->colorimetry(); # get colorimetry array slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry($row_slice); # get colorimetry array slice (see note 2)
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry($row_slice, $column_slice); # get colorimetry array slice (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->colorimetry($row_slice, $column_slice, $replacement_array); # set colorimetry array slice (see note 3)

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry(); # get all data
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([]); # same as above (see note 4)
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([], []); # same as above (see note 4)
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([1 .. 3]); # get rows 1 - 3, all columns
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([1 .. 3], []); # same as above
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([1 .. 3], [5 ..7]); # get rows 1 - 3, columns 5 - 7
    $mat = $chart->colorimetry([1, 3, 5], [7, 5, 6]); # get rows 1, 3, 5, columns 7, 5, 6
    $rep = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]];
    $cols = $chart->colorimetry([1 .. 3], [5 ..7], $rep); # set rows 1 - 3, columns 5 - 7
  1. A colorimetry array slice is a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  2. Row and column slices are 1-D arrays of indices

  3. Replacement array slice must be the size indicated by the row and column slices

  4. An empty array [] indicates all rows or columns

Shortcut accessors

These methods are used to get/set the most commonly used data classes. The evaluation of the column slice is built into the method, which is the shortcut. For instance, the following lines are equivalent:

    $mat = $chart->slice($row_slice, $chart->cols(qw(RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B)));

    $mat = $chart->rgb($row_slice);

If you already have the column slice, or make multiple calls, it is more efficient to use the slice method:

    $cols = $chart->cols(qw(RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B));
    $mat1 = $chart->slice($rows1, $cols);
    $mat2 = $chart->slice($rows2, $cols);
    $mat3 = $chart->slice($rows3, $cols);

The shortcut methods also add the context prefix to the list of format keys, if supplied in a hash parameter.

id

This method returns the column slice of the SAMPLE_ID field, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of SAMPLE_ID values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of SAMPLE_ID values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the SAMPLE_ID field is returned.

The context of the SAMPLE_ID field may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->id(); # get SAMPLE_ID column slice
    $mat = $chart->id($row_slice); # get SAMPLE_ID of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->id($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set SAMPLE_ID of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->id(); # get SAMPLE_ID columns slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->id([]); # get SAMPLE_ID of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->id([1 .. 10]); # get SAMPLE_ID of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->id([5], [[1000]]); # set SAMPLE_ID of row 5 to 1000 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->id([1 .. 3], [[1000], [2000], [3000]]); # set SAMPLE_ID of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->id({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->id([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->id([5], [[1000]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If SAMPLE_ID field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and one column.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

name

This method returns the column slice of the SAMPLE_NAME field, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of SAMPLE_NAME values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of SAMPLE_NAME values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the SAMPLE_NAME field is returned.

The context of the SAMPLE_NAME field may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->name(); # get SAMPLE_NAME column slice
    $mat = $chart->name($row_slice); # get SAMPLE_NAME of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->name($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set SAMPLE_NAME of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->name(); # get SAMPLE_NAME columns slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->name([]); # get SAMPLE_NAME of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->name([1 .. 10]); # get SAMPLE_NAME of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->name([5], [['Sky_Blue']]); # set SAMPLE_NAME of row 5 to 'Sky_Blue' (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->name([1 .. 3], [['Sky_Blue'], ['Eggshell'], ['Mauve']]); # set SAMPLE_NAME of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->name({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->name([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->name([5], [[1000]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If SAMPLE_NAME field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and one column.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. The SAMPLE_NAME key is used by ProfileMaker software, and usually indicates the sample's row and column location.

  7. For CxF3 files, the 'Name' attribute of cc:Object elements is mapped to the SAMPLE_NAME field.

rgb

This method returns the column slice of the RGB fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of RGB values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of RGB values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the RGB fields is returned.

The context of the RGB fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->rgb(); # get RGB column slice
    $mat = $chart->rgb($row_slice); # get RGB values of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->rgb($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set RGB values of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->rgb(); # get RGB columns slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->rgb([]); # get RGB values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->rgb([1 .. 10]); # get RGB values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->rgb([5], [[255, 0, 0]]); # set RGB values of row 5 to 255, 0, 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->rgb([1 .. 3], [[255, 0, 0], [0, 255, 0], [0, 0, 255]]); # set RGB of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->rgb({'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->rgb([], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->rgb([5], [[255, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If RGB_R, RGB_G or RGB_B field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and three columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

cmyk

This method returns the column slice of the CMYK fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of CMYK values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of CMYK values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the CMYK fields is returned.

The context of the CMYK fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->cmyk(); # get CMYK column slice
    $mat = $chart->cmyk($row_slice); # get CMYK values of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->cmyk($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set CMYK values of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->cmyk(); # get CMYK columns slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->cmyk([]); # get CMYK values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->cmyk([1 .. 10]); # get CMYK values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->cmyk([5], [[100, 0, 0, 0]]); # set CMYK values of row 5 to 100, 0, 0, 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->cmyk([1 .. 3], [[100, 0, 0, 0], [0, 100, 0, 0], [0, 0, 100, 0]]); # set CMYK of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->cmyk({'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->cmyk([], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->cmyk([5], [[100, 0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If CMYK_C, CMYK_M, CMYK_Y or CMYK_K field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and four columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

hex

This method returns the column slice of the 6CLR fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of 6CLR values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of 6CLR values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the 6CLR fields is returned.

The context of the 6CLR fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->hex(); # get 6/C column slice
    $mat = $chart->hex($row_slice); # get 6/C values of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->hex($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set 6/C values of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->hex(); # get 6/C columns slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->hex([]); # get 6/C values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->hex([1 .. 10]); # get 6/C values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->hex([5], [[100, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]); # set 6/C values of row 5 to 100, 0, 0, 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->hex([1 .. 3], [[100, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 100, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 100, 0, 0, 0]]); # set 6/C of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->hex({'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->hex([], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->hex([5], [[100, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If 6CLR_1, 6CLR_2, 6CLR_3, 6CLR_4, 6CLR_5 or 6CLR_6 field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and six columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. The 6CLR keys are used by ProfileMaker software and follow the ICC convention for color space signatures.

nCLR

This method returns the column slice of the nCLR fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of nCLR values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of nCLR values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the nCLR fields is returned.

The context of the nCLR fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->nCLR(); # get n-color column slice
    $mat = $chart->nCLR($row_slice); # get n-color values of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->nCLR($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set n-color values of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->nCLR(); # get n-color columns slice (see notes 1 and 6)
    $mat = $chart->nCLR([]); # get n-color values of all rows (see notes 1, 2, 3 and 6)
    $mat = $chart->nCLR([1 .. 10]); # get n-color values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->nCLR([5], [[100, 0, 0, ... 0]]); # set n-color values of row 5 to 100, 0, 0, .. 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->nCLR([1 .. 3], [[100, 0, 0, ... 0], [0, 100, 0, ... 0], [0, 0, 100, ... 0]]); # set n-color of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->nCLR({'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->nCLR([], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->nCLR([5], [[100, 0, 0, ... 0]], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $n = @{$cols}; # get the number of channels from column slice (see note 6)
    $n = @{$mat->[0]}; # get the number of channels from data matrix (see note 6)
  1. If any nCLR field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and columns as columns slice (n)

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. The number of channels is between 2 and 15

  7. The nCLR keys are used by ProfileMaker software and follow the ICC convention for color space signatures.

device

This method returns the column slice of the device fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of device values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of device values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the device fields is returned.

The context of the device fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->device(); # get device column slice
    $mat = $chart->device($row_slice); # get device values of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->device($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set device values of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->device(); # get device columns slice (see note 1, 6, and 7)
    $mat = $chart->device([]); # get device values of all rows (see notes 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8)
    $mat = $chart->device([1 .. 10]); # get device values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->device([5], [[1.0, 0, 0, ... 0]]); # set device values of row 5 to 1.0, 0, 0, .. 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->device([1 .. 3], [[1.0, 0, 0, ... 0], [0, 1.0, 0, ... 0], [0, 0, 1.0, ... 0]]); # set device of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->device({'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->device([], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->device([5], [[1.0, 0, 0, ... 0]], {'context' => 'Target'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $n = @{$cols}; # get the number of channels from column slice (see note 7)
    $n = @{$mat->[0]}; # get the number of channels from data matrix (see note 7)
  1. If any device field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and columns as column slice.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. Device fields are RGB, CMYK or nCLR, searched in that order

  7. The number of channels is between 2 and 15

  8. The range of device values is 0 - 1 for all color spaces, RGB, CMYK or nCLR

ctv

This method returns the column slice of the CTV field, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of CTV values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of CTV values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the CTV field is returned.

The context of the CTV field may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->ctv(); # get CTV column slice
    $mat = $chart->ctv($row_slice); # get CTV value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->ctv($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set CTV value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->ctv(); # get CTV column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->ctv([]); # get CTV value of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->ctv([1 .. 10]); # get CTV value of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->ctv([5], [[0]]); # set CTV value of row 5 to 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->ctv([1 .. 3], [[0], [50], [100]]); # set CTV of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->ctv({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->ctv([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->ctv([5], [[0]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If CTV field is missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and one column.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

lab

This method returns the column slice of the L*a*b* fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of L*a*b* values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of L*a*b* values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the L*a*b* fields is returned.

The context of the L*a*b* fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->lab(); # get L*a*b* column slice
    $mat = $chart->lab($row_slice); # get L*a*b* value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->lab($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set L*a*b* value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->lab(); # get L*a*b* column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->lab([]); # get L*a*b* values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->lab([1 .. 10]); # get L*a*b* values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->lab([5], [[0, 0, 0]]); # set L*a*b* values of row 5 to 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->lab([1 .. 3], [[0, 0, 0], [50, 0, 0], [100, 0, 0]]); # set L*a*b* of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->lab({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->lab([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->lab([5], [[0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->lab([], {'encoding' => 0}); # with encoding (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->lab([5], [[0, 0, 0]], {'encoding' => 0}); # with encoding (see note 6)
  1. If LAB_L, LAB_A or LAB_B fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and three columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. Encoding is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter Supported values are:

        0 - 8-bit ICC CIELAB (100, 0, 0 => 255/255, 128/255, 128/255 = 1, 0.50196, 0.50196)
        0 - 16-bit ICC CIELAB (100, 0, 0 => 65535/65535, 32896/65535, 32896/65535 = 1, 0.50196, 0.50196)
        1 - 16-bit ICC legacy L*a*b* (100, 0, 0 => 65280/65535, 32768/65535, 32768/65535 = 0.99611, 0.50001, 0.50001)
        2 - 16-bit EFI/Monaco L*a*b* (100, 0, 0 => 65535/65535, 32768/65535, 32768/65535 = 1, 0.50001, 0.50001)
        3 - L*a*b* (100, 0, 0 => 100, 0, 0)
        4 - LxLyLz (100, 0, 0 => 100, 100, 100)
        5 - unit LxLyLz (100, 0, 0 => 1, 1, 1)
    
        0 is both 8-bit and 16-bit CIELAB encoding from the ICC v4 specification.
        1 is the 16-bit L*a*b* encoding from the ICC v2 specification, and also applies to mft2 and ncl2 tags within v4 profiles.
        2 is a non-standard L*a*b* encoding used by EFI and Monaco in their v2 profiles.
        3 is standard L*a*b* encoding, used in measurement files.
        4 is L* encoding of xyz values.
        5 is unit L* encoding of xyz values.

xyz

This method returns the column slice of the XYZ fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of XYZ values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of XYZ values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the XYZ fields is returned.

The context of the XYZ fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->xyz(); # get XYZ column slice
    $mat = $chart->xyz($row_slice); # get XYZ value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->xyz($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set XYZ value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->xyz(); # get XYZ column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->xyz([]); # get XYZ values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->xyz([1 .. 10]); # get XYZ values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->xyz([5], [[0, 0, 0]]); # set XYZ values of row 5 to 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->xyz([1 .. 3], [[0, 0, 0], [50, 50, 50], [100, 100, 100]]); # set XYZ of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->xyz({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->xyz([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->xyz([5], [[0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->xyz([], {'encoding' => 9}); # with encoding (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->xyz([5], [[0, 0, 0]], {'encoding' => 9}); # with encoding (see note 6)
  1. If XYZ_X, XYZ_Y or XYZ_Z fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and three columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. Encoding is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter Supported values are:

        4 - LxLyLz (100, 0, 0 => 100, 100, 100)
        7 - 16-bit ICC XYZ (100, 0, 0 => 0.48210, 0.50000, 0.41245)
        8 - 32-bit ICC XYZNumber (100, 0, 0 => 0.9642, 1.0, 0.8249)
        9 - xyz (100, 0, 0 => 1, 1, 1)
        10 - XYZ (100, 0, 0 => 96.42, 100, 82.49)
        11 - media relative xyz (media white => 1, 1, 1)
    
        4 is L* encoding of xyz values
        7 is the 16-bit XYZ encoding from ICC v2 and v4 specifications. 8-bit XYZ encoding is undefined by the ICC specification.
        8 is the 32-bit format used by XYZ tags, and the format used to set absolute colorimetry when creating PCS objects.
        9 is X/Xn, Y/Yn, Z/Zn, as defined in ISO 13655, and requires an illuminant value (in the colorimetry array).
        10 is standard XYZ encoding, used in measurement files.
        11 is X/Xmw, Y/Ymw, Z/Zmw, and requires a media white value (in the colorimetry array).

density

This method accesses density values, per ISO 5-3. These fields are created from spectral data using the 'add_density' method.

This method returns the column slice of the density fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of density values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of density values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the density fields is returned.

The context of the density fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->density(); # get density column slice
    $mat = $chart->density($row_slice); # get density value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->density($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set density value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt'); # spectral data
    $chart->add_density({'status' => 'T'}); # add density values

    $cols = $chart->density(); # get density column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->density([]); # get density values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->density([1 .. 10]); # get density values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->density([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]]); # set density values of row 5 to 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->density([1 .. 3], [[0, 0, 0, 0], [1.0, 0, 0, 0], [2.0, 0, 0, 0]]); # set density of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->density({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->density([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->density([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->density([], {'encoding' => 'linear'}); # with encoding (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->density([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]], {'encoding' => 'linear'}); # with encoding (see note 6)
  1. If D_RED, D_GREEN, D_BLUE, or D_VIS fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and four columns.

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. Encoding is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter. Supported values are:

        'density' - normal density values as specified in ISO 5-3 (default)
        'linear' - reflectance/transmittance values as specified in ISO 5-3 (100 * 10^-D)
        'unit' - reflectance/transmittance values with range (0 - 1)
        'L*' - L* encoded values with range (0 - 100)

rgbv

This method accesses reflectance/transmittance values, per ISO 5-3. These fields are created from spectral data using the 'add_density' method, with the encoding set to 'linear'. Reflectance/transmittance values are commonly used to compute TVI.

This method returns the column slice of the reflectance/transmittance fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of reflectance/transmittance values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of reflectance/transmittance values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the reflectance/transmittance fields is returned.

The context of the reflectance/transmittance fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->rgbv(); # get reflectance/transmittance column slice
    $mat = $chart->rgbv($row_slice); # get reflectance/transmittance value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->rgbv($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set reflectance/transmittance value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt'); # spectral data
    $chart->add_density({'status' => 'T', 'encoding' => 'linear'}); # add reflectance/transmittance values

    $cols = $chart->rgbv(); # get reflectance/transmittance column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->rgbv([]); # get reflectance/transmittance values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->rgbv([1 .. 10]); # get reflectance/transmittance values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->rgbv([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]]); # set reflectance/transmittance values of row 5 to 0 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->rgbv([1 .. 3], [[0, 0, 0, 0], [1.0, 0, 0, 0], [2.0, 0, 0, 0]]); # set reflectance/transmittance of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->rgbv({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->rgbv([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->rgbv([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->rgbv([], {'encoding' => 'unit'}); # with encoding (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->rgbv([5], [[0, 0, 0, 0]], {'encoding' => 'unit'}); # with encoding (see note 6)
  1. If R_RED, R_GREEN, R_BLUE, or R_VIS fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and four columns

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

  6. Encoding is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter. Supported values are:

        'linear' - reflectance/transmittance values as specified in ISO 5-3 (default)
        'unit' - reflectance/transmittance values with range (0 - 1)
        'density' - normal density values as specified in ISO 5-3 (-log10(R/100))
        'L*' - L* encoded values with range (0 - 100)

    Note that reflectance/transmittance values must be positive (> 0) to be correctly encoded as 'density'.

spectral

This method returns the column slice of the spectral fields, when no parameters are provided.

This method gets a group of spectral values from the data array, when a row slice is provided. The group is returned as a Math::Matrix object.

This method sets a group of spectral values in the data array, when a row slice and replacement data are provided. The column slice of the spectral fields is returned.

The context of the spectral fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Values are ordered from low to high wavelength.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->spectral(); # get spectral reflectance column slice
    $mat = $chart->spectral($row_slice); # get spectral reflectance value of specified rows
    $cols = $chart->spectral($row_slice, $replacement_array); # set spectral reflectance value of specified rows

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->spectral(); # get spectral reflectance column slice (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->spectral([]); # get spectral reflectance values of all rows (see notes 1, 2 and 3)
    $mat = $chart->spectral([1 .. 10]); # get spectral reflectance values of rows 1 - 10
    $cols = $chart->spectral([5], [[(0) x 36]]); # set spectral reflectance values of row 5 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->spectral([1 .. 3], [[(0) x 36], [(0.5) x 36], [(1.0) x 36]]); # set spectral reflectance of rows 1 to 3 (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->spectral({'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $mat = $chart->spectral([], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->spectral([5], [[(0) x 36]], {'context' => 'My'}); # with context prefix (see note 5)
  1. If spectral fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Returns a Math::Matrix object, which has the structure of a 2-D array

  3. An empty array [] indicates all rows

  4. Replacement array must have same number of rows as row slice, and columns as column slice

  5. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash, which must be the last parameter

wavelength

This method returns an array of the spectral wavelengths.

Values are ordered from low to high wavelength.

The context of the spectral fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter.

Usage

    $nms = $chart->wavelength(); # get spectral wavelengths

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $nms = $chart->wavelength(); # get spectral wavelengths (see notes 1 and 2)
    $nms = $chart->wavelength({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix
  1. If spectral fields are missing, returns 'undef'

  2. Wavelengths are sorted from low to high

nm

This method returns the wavelength range of a spectral slice.

The structure of a wavlength range is: [start_nm, end_nm, increment]

The context of the spectral fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->nm(); # get wavelength range of spectral slice

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->nm(); # get wavelength range (see note 1)
    $cols = $chart->nm({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}; # with context prefix
  1. Returns 'undef' if the chart has no spectral data.

iwtpt

This method returns the illuminant white point as an XYZ vector.

XYZ or L*a*b* data is required.

If the white point cannot be determined, D50 is returned.

The context of the XYZ or L*a*b* fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. The XYZ encoding may also be specified with the hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt(); # get illuminant white point
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt(); # get illuminant white point (see notes 1 and 2)
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix (see note 3)
    $xyz = $chart->iwtpt({'encoding' => 9}); # with xyz encoding (see note 4)
  1. Returns an XYZ vector (1-D array)

  2. Default white point value is ICC D50

  3. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash

  4. XYZ encoding is specified with optional parameter hash

wtpt

This method returns the media white point as an XYZ vector.

XYZ or L*a*b* data is required.

If the white point cannot be determined, warns and returns 'undef'.

The context of the XYZ or L*a*b* fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. The XYZ encoding may also be specified with the hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $xyz = $chart->wtpt(); # get media white point
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt(); # get media white point (see notes 1 and 2)
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix (see note 3)
    $xyz = $chart->wtpt({'encoding' => 9}); # with xyz encoding (see note 4)
  1. Returns an XYZ vector (1-D array)

  2. Requires device and colorimetric data, otherwise returns 'undef'

  3. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash

  4. XYZ encoding is specified with optional parameter hash

bkpt

This method returns the media black point as an XYZ vector.

XYZ or L*a*b* data is required.

If the white point cannot be determined, warns and returns 'undef'.

The context of the XYZ or L*a*b* fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter. The XYZ encoding may also be specified with the hash parameter. This hash must be the last parameter.

Usage

    $xyz = $chart->bkpt(); # get media black point
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt(); # get media black point (see notes 1 and 2)
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix (see note 3)
    $xyz = $chart->bkpt({'encoding' => 9}); # with xyz encoding (see note 4)
  1. Returns an XYZ vector (1-D array)

  2. Requires device and colorimetric data, otherwise returns 'undef'

  3. Context prefix is specified with optional parameter hash

  4. XYZ encoding is specified with optional parameter hash

oba_index

This method returns the media OBA index.

M1 and M2 data is required – spectral, XYZ or L*a*b*.

If the OBA index cannot be determined, warns and returns 'undef'.

The context of the M1 and M2 data and the sample number may be specified with an optional hash parameter.

Usage

    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index(); # get OBA index
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index($hash); # with optional parameter

    ($m1, $m2) = $chart->oba_index(); # get the M1/M2 XYZ vectors
    ($m1, $m2) = $chart->oba_index($hash); # with optional parameter

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf'); # chart contains M1 and M2 data
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index(); # get OBA index (see note 1)
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index({'context' => ['M1_Measurement', 'M2_Measurement']}); # with contexts (see note 2)
    $oba_index = $chart->oba_index({'sample' => 1000}); # with specified sample (see note 3)
    ($m1, $m2) = $chart->oba_index(); # get M1/M2 XYZ vectors (see note 4)
  1. Default contexts ('M1_Measurement' and 'M2_Measurement') are used.

    Paper white sample(s) are located using device values and averaged, by default.

  2. Contexts may be specfied using an optional hash. The hash value is an array reference containing M1 and M2 contexts.

  3. The sample number may be specified using an optional hash, which is required when the chart has no device values.

  4. The media white point M1/M2 XYZ vectors are returned when the function is called in the array context. Colorimetry is D50, 2 degree observer.

cat

This method returns the chromatic adaptation transform object (CAT) associated with XYZ data. A CAT object is optionally created when adding XYZ data.

XYZ data is required.

Returns 'undef' if there is no CAT.

The context of the XYZ fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter.

Usage

    $cat = $chart->cat(); # get CAT object
    $cat = $chart->cat($hash); # with optional hash parameter

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_spectral_data.txt');
    $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'F11', 'cat' => 'bradford'});
    $cat = $chart->cat(); # get CAT object (see notes 1 and 2)
    $cat = $chart->cat({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix (see note 3)
  1. Returns an 'ICC::Profile::matf' object

  2. Requires XYZ data added using a CAT, otherwise returns 'undef'

  3. Context prefix is specified with optional hash parameter

color

This method returns the Color object associated with XYZ data. A Color object is created when adding XYZ data from spectral data.

XYZ data is required.

Returns 'undef' if there is no Color object.

The context of the XYZ fields may be specified with an optional hash parameter.

Usage

    $color = $chart->color(); # get Color object
    $color = $chart->color($hash); # with optional hash parameter

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_spectral_data.txt');
    $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'F11', 'cat' => 'bradford'});
    $color = $chart->color(); # get Color object (see notes 1 and 2)
    $color = $chart->color({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # with context prefix (see note 3)
  1. Returns an 'ICC::Support::Color' object

  2. Requires XYZ data added using a Color object, otherwise returns 'undef'

  3. Context prefix is specified with optional hash parameter

Adding data

add_avg

This method is for averaging samples in a single, existing chart. If you have multiple measurement files to average (e.g. sheets pulled from a press run), put them in a folder, and make a chart from the folder (see new method).

Usage

    $rows = $chart->add_avg($row_slice); # add average row
    $rows = $chart->add_avg($row_slice, $hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $rows = $chart->add_avg([1, 3, 5]); # add average sample (see notes 1 and 2)
    $rows = $chart->add_avg([1, 3, 5], {'method' => 'SIMPLE'}); (see note 3)
    $rows = $chart->add_avg([], {'name' => 'average_all_samples'}); (see note 3)
  1. New sample is appended to end of data array

  2. Only measurements (i.e. spectral, XYZ, L*a*b* and density columns) are averaged

  3. Hash keys are 'method', 'id', and 'name'

    Hash values for 'method' are 'LINEAR' and 'SIMPLE', default is 'LINEAR'. L*a*b* and density values are converted to/from linear values for 'LINEAR' averaging.

    Hash value for 'id' overrides default value of the added row index.

    Hash value for 'name' overrides default value of first sample name with '_AVG' appended.

add_fmt

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_fmt(@list); # add format fields

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_fmt(qw(RGB_R RGB_G RGB_B)); # add RGB columns (see note 1 and 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_fmt(qw(Target|RGB_R Target|RGB_G Target|RGB_B)); # with context
  1. New fields are appended to end of format array

  2. No data is added, just the format fields

add_ctv

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_ctv(); # add CTV data
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv(); # add CTV data (see notes 1 and 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'coef' => [1, 2, 1, 2, 0, 5]}); # Mahalanobis coefficients (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'context' => 'M0_measurement', 'added' => 'My'}); # with contexts
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => 'F2'}); # ASTM illuminant (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => 'F2', 'cat' => 'cat02'}); # transformed to D50 using a CAT02 matrix (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => ['CIE', 'FL10']}); # CIE standard illuminant (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => []}); # no illuminant, for emissive measurements (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => ['DATA']}); # data file illuminant (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => [$nm, $spd]}); # illuminant as range and spd vector (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => [daylight(5000)], 'added' => 'CCT_5000K'}); # CIE daylight, specified by CCT
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1]}); # measured illuminant (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1], 'imethod' => 'linear', 'ibandpass' => 'trapezoid'}); # (see note 9)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'iwtpt' => $chart->wtpt()}); # supplied illuminant white point (see note 7)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'oba' => 0.5}); # add OBA effect (see note 8)
    $cols = $chart->add_ctv({'oba' => 0.5, 'context' => ['M1_Measurement', 'M2_Measurement']}); # with context (see note 8)
  1. Requires L*a*b* data and media white point

  2. L*a*b* data will be added from XYZ or spectral data, if missing

    Default colorimetry is ASTM E 308 table 5.9 - D50, 2 degree observer, 10 nm increment, no bandpass correction.

  3. CTV is the Mahalanobis distance to media white in Lx, Ly, Lz space, coefficients are [Lx, Ly, Lz, (Ly - Lz), (Lx - Lz), (Lx - Ly)], default is [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0]

  4. Hash keys are 'coef', 'illuminant', 'observer', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'F2', 'F7', or 'F11', default is 'D50'

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', default is '2'

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle', 'trapezoid' or 'six', default is no bandpass correction

    A bandpass value of 'astm' selects the ASTM E 2729 method (the current standard).

    A bandpass value of 'six' selects table 6 from ASTM E 308, which is deprecated by ASTM E 2729.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect.

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  5. Hash keys are 'coef', 'illuminant', 'observer', 'increment', 'method', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are [], [source, id], or [nm, spd]

    An empty array indicates no illuminant, for emissive measurements

    Values for 'source' are 'CIE', 'Philips', 'DATA' or a measurement file path

    Values for 'id' depend on the source

    CIE illuminants are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'FL1' to 'FL12', 'FL3.1' to 'FL3.15', 'HP1' to 'HP5', and 'E'

    Philips illuminants are '60_A/W', 'C100S54', 'C100S54C', 'F32T8/TL830', 'F32T8/TL835', 'F32T8/TL841', 'F32T8/TL850', 'F32T8/TL865/PLUS', 'F34/CW/RS/EW', 'F34T12WW/RS/EW', 'F40/C50', 'F40/C75', 'F40/CWX', 'F40/DX', 'F40/DXTP', 'F40/N', 'F34T12/LW/RS/EW', 'H38HT-100', 'H38JA-100/DX', 'MHC100/U/MP/3K', 'MHC100/U/MP/4K', and 'SDW-T_100W/LV'

    DATA selects an illuminant measurement appended to the data set (ProfileMaker)

    With a measurement file path, the 'id' is the sample number

    The illuminant may also be specified by wavelength range and spd vector

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', '2P' or '10P' ('2P' and '10P' are the CIE (2012) "physiologically-relevant" CMFs), default is '2'

    Hash values for 'increment' are '1' or '5', default is '1'

    Hash values for 'method' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'cspline' (interpolation method)

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  6. XYZ values are computed with an optional chromatic adaptation transform (CAT)

    The CAT transforms XYZ values from the actual illuminant white point to D50, as in ProfileMaker

    The CAT transform is enabled by adding a 'cat' parameter to the hash

    Hash values for 'cat' are 'bradford', 'cat02' or 'quasi'

  7. Illuminant is an XYZ vector, and is used only to calculate L*a*b* values from XYZ values. Media-relative L*a*b* values may be computed by setting this parameter to the media white point.

  8. The OBA effect requires M1 and M2 spectral data. The hash value is a factor indicating the OBA excitation relative to D50.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect

    When the OBA effect is specified, the context is an array reference containing the context of M1 and M2 spectral data.

    Default contexts are 'M1_Measurement' and 'M2_Measurement'.

  9. The illuminant interpolation method and bandpass correction are set by 'imethod' and 'ibandpass' keys.

    Hash values for 'imethod' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'linear' or 'cspline', based on smoothness of the SPD

    Hash values for 'ibandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

add_lab

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_lab(); # add L*a*b* data
    $cols = $chart->add_lab($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_lab(); # add L*a*b* data (see notes 1 and 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'context' => 'M0_measurement', 'added' => 'My'}); # with contexts
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => 'F2'}); # ASTM illuminant (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => 'F2', 'cat' => 'cat02'}); # transformed to D50 using a CAT02 matrix (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => ['CIE', 'FL10']}); # CIE standard illuminant (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => []}); # no illuminant, for emissive measurements (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => ['DATA']}); # data file illuminant (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => [$nm, $spd]}); # illuminant as range and spd vector (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => [daylight(5000)], 'added' => 'CCT_5000K'}); # CIE daylight, specified by CCT
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1]}); # measured illuminant (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1], 'imethod' => 'linear', 'ibandpass' => 'trapezoid'}); # (see note 8)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'iwtpt' => $chart->wtpt()}); # supplied illuminant white point (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'oba' => 0.5}); # add OBA effect (see note 7)
    $cols = $chart->add_lab({'oba' => 0.5, 'context' => ['M1_Measurement', 'M2_Measurement']}); # with context (see note 7)
  1. Requires XYZ data and illuminant white point

  2. XYZ data will be added from spectral data, if missing

    Default colorimetry is ASTM E 308 table 5.9 - D50, 2 degree observer, 10 nm increment, no bandpass correction.

  3. Hash keys are 'illuminant', 'observer', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'F2', 'F7', or 'F11', default is 'D50'

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', default is '2'

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle', 'trapezoid' or 'six', default is no bandpass correction

    A bandpass value of 'astm' selects the ASTM E 2729 method (the current standard).

    A bandpass value of 'six' selects table 6 from ASTM E 308, which is deprecated by ASTM E 2729.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect.

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  4. Hash keys are 'illuminant', 'observer', 'increment', 'method', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are [], [source, id], or [nm, spd]

    An empty array indicates no illuminant, for emissive measurements

    Values for 'source' are 'CIE', 'Philips', 'DATA' or a measurement file path

    Values for 'id' depend on the source

    CIE illuminants are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'FL1' to 'FL12', 'FL3.1' to 'FL3.15', 'HP1' to 'HP5', and 'E'

    Philips illuminants are '60_A/W', 'C100S54', 'C100S54C', 'F32T8/TL830', 'F32T8/TL835', 'F32T8/TL841', 'F32T8/TL850', 'F32T8/TL865/PLUS', 'F34/CW/RS/EW', 'F34T12WW/RS/EW', 'F40/C50', 'F40/C75', 'F40/CWX', 'F40/DX', 'F40/DXTP', 'F40/N', 'F34T12/LW/RS/EW', 'H38HT-100', 'H38JA-100/DX', 'MHC100/U/MP/3K', 'MHC100/U/MP/4K', and 'SDW-T_100W/LV'

    DATA selects an illuminant measurement appended to the data set (ProfileMaker)

    With a measurement file path, the 'id' is the sample number

    The illuminant may also be specified by wavelength range and spd vector

    The illuminant interpolation method and bandpass correction are set by 'imethod' and 'ibandpass' keys.

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', '2P' or '10P' ('2P' and '10P' are the CIE (2012) "physiologically-relevant" CMFs), default is '2'

    Hash values for 'increment' are '1' or '5', default is '1'

    Hash values for 'method' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'cspline' (interpolation method)

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  5. XYZ values are computed with an optional chromatic adaptation transform (CAT)

    The CAT transforms XYZ values from the actual illuminant white point to D50, as in ProfileMaker

    The CAT transform is enabled by adding a 'cat' parameter to the hash

    Hash values for 'cat' are 'bradford', 'cat02' or 'quasi'

  6. Illuminant is an XYZ vector, and is used only to calculate L*a*b* values from XYZ values. Media-relative L*a*b* values may be computed by setting this parameter to the media white point.

  7. The OBA effect requires M1 and M2 spectral data. The hash value is a factor indicating the OBA excitation relative to D50.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect

    When the OBA effect is specified, the context is an array reference containing the context of M1 and M2 spectral data.

    Default contexts are 'M1_Measurement' and 'M2_Measurement'.

  8. The illuminant interpolation method and bandpass correction are set by 'imethod' and 'ibandpass' keys.

    Hash values for 'imethod' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'linear' or 'cspline', based on smoothness of the SPD

    Hash values for 'ibandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

add_xyz

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_xyz(); # add XYZ data
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz(); # add XYZ data (see note 1)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'context' => 'M0_measurement', 'added' => 'My'}); # with contexts
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'F2'}); # ASTM illuminant (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => 'F2', 'cat' => 'cat02'}); # transformed to D50 using a CAT02 matrix (see note 4)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => ['CIE', 'FL10']}); # CIE standard illuminant (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => []}); # no illuminant, for emissive measurements (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => ['DATA']}); # data file illuminant (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => [$nm, $spd]}); # illuminant as range and spd vector (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => [daylight(5000)], 'added' => 'CCT_5000K'}); # CIE daylight, specified by CCT
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1]}); # measured illuminant (see note 3)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'illuminant' => ['~/Desktop/my_illum.txt', 1], 'imethod' => 'linear', 'ibandpass' => 'trapezoid'}); # (see note 6)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'oba' => 0.5}); # add OBA effect (see note 5)
    $cols = $chart->add_xyz({'oba' => 0.5, 'context' => ['M1_Measurement', 'M2_Measurement']}); # with context (see note 5)
  1. Requires spectral or L*a*b* data, and illuminant

    Default colorimetry is ASTM E 308 table 5.9 - D50, 2 degree observer, 10 nm increment, no bandpass correction.

  2. Hash keys are 'illuminant', 'observer', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'F2', 'F7', or 'F11', default is 'D50'

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', default is '2'

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle', 'trapezoid' or 'six', default is no bandpass correction

    A bandpass value of 'astm' selects the ASTM E 2729 method (the current standard).

    A bandpass value of 'six' selects table 6 from ASTM E 308, which is deprecated by ASTM E 2729.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect.

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  3. Hash keys are 'illuminant', 'observer', 'increment', 'method', 'bandpass', 'oba', 'cat', 'context' and 'added'

    Hash values for 'illuminant' are [], [source, id], or [nm, spd]

    An empty array indicates no illuminant, for emissive measurements

    Values for 'source' are 'CIE', 'Philips', 'DATA' or a measurement file path

    Values for 'id' depend on the source

    CIE illuminants are 'A', 'C', 'D50', 'D55', 'D65', 'D75', 'FL1' to 'FL12', 'FL3.1' to 'FL3.15', 'HP1' to 'HP5', and 'E'

    Philips illuminants are '60_A/W', 'C100S54', 'C100S54C', 'F32T8/TL830', 'F32T8/TL835', 'F32T8/TL841', 'F32T8/TL850', 'F32T8/TL865/PLUS', 'F34/CW/RS/EW', 'F34T12WW/RS/EW', 'F40/C50', 'F40/C75', 'F40/CWX', 'F40/DX', 'F40/DXTP', 'F40/N', 'F34T12/LW/RS/EW', 'H38HT-100', 'H38JA-100/DX', 'MHC100/U/MP/3K', 'MHC100/U/MP/4K', and 'SDW-T_100W/LV'

    DATA selects an illuminant measurement appended to the data set (ProfileMaker)

    With a measurement file path, the 'id' is the sample number

    The illuminant may also be specified by wavelength range and spd vector

    The illuminant interpolation method and bandpass correction are set by 'imethod' and 'ibandpass' keys.

    Hash values for 'observer' are '2', '10', '2P' or '10P' ('2P' and '10P' are the CIE (2012) "physiologically-relevant" CMFs), default is '2'

    Hash values for 'increment' are '1' or '5', default is '1' (this is increment of the color-matching functions)

    Hash values for 'method' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'cspline' (interpolation method)

    Hash values for 'bandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

  4. XYZ values are computed with an optional chromatic adaptation transform (CAT)

    The CAT transforms XYZ values from the actual illuminant white point to D50, as in ProfileMaker

    The CAT transform is enabled by adding a 'cat' parameter to the hash

    Hash values for 'cat' are 'bradford', 'cat02' or 'quasi'

    The 'cat' value may also be an existing 'cat' object (more specifically, an 'ICC::Profile::matf' object)

  5. The OBA effect requires M1 and M2 spectral data. The hash value is a factor indicating the OBA excitation relative to D50.

    Hash value for 'oba' is a real value, typically between 0 and 1, default is no OBA effect

    When the OBA effect is specified, the context is an array reference containing the context of M1 and M2 spectral data.

    Default contexts are 'M1_Measurement' and 'M2_Measurement'.

  6. The illuminant interpolation method and bandpass correction are set by 'imethod' and 'ibandpass' keys.

    Hash values for 'imethod' are 'linear', 'cspline' or 'lagrange', default is 'linear' or 'cspline', based on smoothness of the SPD

    Hash values for 'ibandpass' are 'astm', 'triangle' or 'trapezoid', default is no bandpass correction

add_density

This method adds density or reflectance/transmittance data, per ISO 5-3.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_density(); # add density data
    $cols = $chart->add_density($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_density(); # add density data (see notes 1)
    $cols = $chart->add_density({'context' => 'M0_measurement', 'added' => 'My'}); # with contexts (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_density({'status' => 'T'}); # ISO 5-3 status (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_density({'encoding' => 'linear'}); # add reflectance/transmittance data (see notes 2, 3 and 4)
  1. Requires spectral data

  2. Hash keys are 'status', 'context', 'added' and 'encoding'

    Hash values for 'status' are 'A', 'M', 'T', 'E', 'I', default is 'T'

    Default value for 'context' is 'undef' (no prefix)

    Default value for 'added' is the 'context' value

    Hash values for 'encoding' are 'density' and 'linear', default is 'density'

  3. The range of 'linear' values is 0 - 100, per ISO 5-3

  4. Data format keys for 'density' encoding are 'D_RED', 'D_GREEN', 'D_BLUE' and 'D_VIS', per ISO 28178

    Data format keys for 'linear' encoding are 'R_RED', 'R_GREEN', 'R_BLUE' and 'R_VIS'

add_udf

This method adds data computed by a user-defined function (udf). Two types of udfs are possible, selected by the 'element' or 'sample' keys in the parameter hash. An 'element' udf is used to compute a sample one element at a time, with each element processed identically. A 'sample' udf is used to compute an entire sample at once, with flexibility of inputs and outputs.

The input parameters for 'add_udf' are a list of column slices and a hash. The column slices define the inputs to the udf. For an 'element' udf, a scalar column index may also be used. A column slice for the added data is returned.

An 'element' udf is called once for each element of a column slice. The column slices must all be the same size. The input parameters to the 'element' udf are a single value from each of the slices, followed by the slice index. If a column slice is a scalar, the data value of that column is used as the udf input parameter, regardless of the index. A single computed value is returned.

A 'sample' udf is called just once for each sample. The column slices may be various sizes. The input parameters to the 'sample' udf are data slices corresponding to the column slices. Computed value(s) are returned as a list.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_udf($cols1, $cols2, ... $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.mxf'); # chart contains spectral data with multiple measurement conditions
    $m1 = $chart->spectral({'context' => 'M1_Measurement'}); # M1 column slice
    $m2 = $chart->spectral({'context' => 'M2_Measurement'}); # M2 column slice
    $dev = $chart->device({'context' => 'Target'});

    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'element' => sub {return(($_[0] + $_[1])/2)}}); # averages M1 and M2 data, element-by-element, see notes 1 and 2
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'sample' => sub {return(map {($_[0][$_] + $_[1][$_])/2} (0 .. $#{$_[0]}))}}); # averages entire sample
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'element' => sub {return(($_[0] + $_[1])/2)}, 'rows' => [1, 2, 3]}); # set row slice, see note 2
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'element' => sub {return(($_[0] + $_[1])/2)}, 'start' => 100}); # set starting column index, see note 2
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'element' => sub {return(($_[0] + $_[1])/2)}, 'added' => 'avg'}); # set data format context, see note 2
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($m1, $m2, {'element' => sub {return(($_[0] + $_[1])/2)}, 'added' => [map {"avg_$_"} (0 .. 35)]}); # set data format, see note 2
    $cols = $chart->add_udf($dev, {'sample' => sub {return(@{$_[0]})}, 'device' => 1, 'added' => 'dev'}); # add device values, see note 2
  1. Each column slice must be the same size for an 'element' udf

    Scalar column indices are also allowed for an 'element' udf

  2. Hash keys are 'element', 'sample', 'device', 'rows', 'start', and 'added'

    Hash value for 'element' is a user-defined function (CODE reference) that processes element-by-element

    UDF input parameters are a single value for each column slice, followed by the column index, output is a single calculated value

    Hash value for 'sample' is a user-defined function (CODE reference) that processes an entire sample at once

    UDF input parameters are arrays of values for each column slice, output is an array of calculated values

    Either an 'element' udf or a 'sample' udf is required, but not both

    Hash value for 'device' is a flag. If true, RGB/CMYK/nCLR values are converted to device values for input to the udf. Default is false.

    Hash value for 'rows' is a row slice of the rows to be computed. Default is all rows

    Hash value for 'start' is the column index of the first added column. Default is to append

    Hash value for 'added' is either a scalar, an array of scalars, or undef. Default is 'udf'

add_date

This method appends a column containing the creation date, which is useful when exporting data to other applications. The creation date is normally stored in the header array, and is accessed with the "created" method.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_date(); # add creation date
    $cols = $chart->add_date($hash); # with optional parameters

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $cols = $chart->add_date(); # add creation date (see note 1)
    $cols = $chart->add_date({'context' => 'M0_measurement', 'added' => 'My'}); # with contexts (see note 2)
    $cols = $chart->add_date({'status' => 'T'}); # ISO 5-3 status (see note 2)
  1. The same date is added for each sample

  2. Hash keys are 'date', 'format' and 'added'

    Default value for 'date' is the 'CREATED' value, or the local time if none

    Default value for 'format' is Unix time

add_rows

This convenience method is used to append data rows to a chart object. It computes the the offset, then calls the 'splice_rows' method. The added row slice is returned.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat);
    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat, $cols);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # adding rows
    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 5]); # get rows 1 - 5
    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat);
    $rows = $chart->add_rows($mat, [3 .. 5]);

add_cols

This convenience method is used to append data columns to a chart object. It computes the the offset, prepends the optional format, then calls the 'splice_cols' method. The added column slice is returned.

Usage

    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat);
    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat, $format);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # adding columns
    $mat = $chart->slice([0 .. $chart->size], [2 .. 4]); # get columns 2 - 4, including format row
    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat);
    $cols = $chart->add_cols($mat, [qw(XYZ_X XYZ_Y XYZ_Z)]);

Splicing Data

splice_rows

This method is used to add or remove data rows to/from a chart object. Perl's splice function is used to modify the data array. The offset and length parameters are passed directly to the splice function. With the proper choice of parameters, this method can insert, replace, append or remove data rows. Removed data is returned as a Math::Matrix object (2-D array structure). The optional column slice maps the columns of the added data to the object's data array. Rebuilds the SAMPLE_ID hash.

Usage

    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows();
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length, $mat);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_rows($offset, $length, $mat, $cols);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # adding rows
    $mat = $chart->slice([1 .. 5]); # get rows 1 - 5
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(1, 0, $mat); # insert at row 1
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(6, 5, $mat); # replace rows 6 - 10
    $rem = $chart->add_rows($mat); # append

    # adding rows with column mapping
    $mat = $chart->lab([1 .. 5]); # get L*a*b* rows 1 - 5
    $cols = $chart->lab(); # get L*a*b* column slice
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(11, 0, $mat, $cols); # insert at row 11

    # removing rows
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(1, 5); # remove rows 1 - 5
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(10); # remove rows 10 onward
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(-1); # remove last row
    $rem = $chart->splice_rows(); # remove all rows

splice_cols

This method is used to add or remove data columns to/from a chart object. Perl's splice function is used to modify the data array. The offset and length parameters are passed directly to the splice function. With the proper choice of parameters, this method can insert, replace, append or remove data columns. Removed data is returned as a Math::Matrix object (2-D array structure). The optional row slice maps the rows of the added data to the object's data array. The colorimetry array is also modified to maintain correspondence with the data array.

Usage

    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols();
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length);
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length, $mat); (see note 1)
    $removed_mat = $chart->splice_cols($offset, $length, $mat, $rows); (see note 1)

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # adding columns
    $mat = $chart->slice([0 .. $chart->size], [2 .. 4]); # get columns 2 - 4, including format row
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(1, 0, $mat); # insert at column 1
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(6, 3, $mat); # replace columns 6 - 8
    $rem = $chart->add_cols($mat); # append

    # adding columns with row mapping
    $mat = $chart->slice([0 .. 5], [2 .. 4]); # get rows 0 - 5, columns 2 - 4
    $rows = [0, 3, 7, 9, 18, 5]; # map to random rows
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(11, 0, $mat, $rows); # insert at row 11

    # removing columns
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(1, 5); # remove columns 1 - 5
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(5); # remove columns 5 onward
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(-1); # remove last column
    $rem = $chart->splice_cols(); # remove all columns
  1. If $mat does not contain a row corresponding to the data array, undef elements are inserted to maintain the array's integrity.

Removing data

remove_rows

This method is used to remove data rows from a chart object. Row 0, the DATA_FORMAT row is preserved. Rebuilds the SAMPLE_ID hash.

Usage

    $removed_mat = $chart->remove_rows($rows);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # removing rows
    $rem = $chart->remove_rows([1 .. 10]); # remove rows 1 - 10
    $rem = $chart->remove_rows([7, 33, 100, 3]); # remove rows - any order is okay
    $rem = $chart->remove_rows([[1 .. 10], 55, 27]); # remove rows - structure is flattened
    $rem = $chart->remove_rows([]); # remove all rows (except row 0, the DATA_FORMAT row)

remove_cols

This method is used to remove data columns from a chart object. The colorimetry array is also modified. Clears the SAMPLE_ID hash if the SAMPLE_ID column is removed.

Usage

    $removed_mat = $chart->remove_cols($rows);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');

    # removing rows
    $rem = $chart->remove_cols([2 .. 4]); # remove columns 2 - 4
    $rem = $chart->remove_cols([4, 3, 2, 7]); # remove columns - any order is okay
    $rem = $chart->remove_cols([$chart->name, $chart->lab]); # remove columns - structure is flattened
    $rem = $chart->remove_cols([]); # remove all columns

Selecting data

find

This method returns a row slice of samples selected by a subroutine. For each sample, data values are passed to this subroutine, which returns 'true' to select that sample. The subroutine is supplied as a code reference.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->find($code_ref);
    $rows = $chart->find($code_ref, $source_rows);
    $rows = $chart->find($code_ref, $source_rows, $source_columns);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt');

    $rows = $chart->find(sub {$_[0] eq 'A27'}, [], $chart->name()); # find sample named 'A27'
    $rows = $chart->find(sub {@_ == grep {$_ == 0} @_}, [], $chart->cmyk()); # find paper white samples (CMYK == 0)
    $rows = $chart->find(sub {$_[0] == 100 && $_[1] == 0 && $_[2] == 100}, [], $chart->cmyk()); # find sample with specific CMY values
    $rows = $chart->find(sub {$_[0] > 90}, [], $chart->lab()); # find samples with L* > 90
    $rows = $chart->find(sub {$_[0] > 90}, [1000 .. $chart->size()], $chart->lab()); # find samples with L* > 90 in sample subset

ramp

This method returns a row slice of samples selected by a subroutine. For each sample, device values are passed to this subroutine, which returns 'true' to select that sample. The subroutine is supplied as a code reference. The chart must have device values.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref);
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, $source_rows);
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, $source_rows, $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt');

    $code_ref = sub {@_ == grep {$_ == 0} @_}; # code block to select paper white samples
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref); # select paper white samples
    $rows = $chart->ramp(sub {@_ == grep {$_ == 0} @_}); # same as above
    $rows = $chart->ramp(sub {3 == grep {$_ == 0}  @_[1 .. 3]}); # select cyan ramp samples (MYK device values == 0)
    $rows = $chart->ramp(sub {$_[3] == 0}); # select samples with no black (K device value == 0)
    $rows = $chart->ramp(sub {$_[3] == 1}); # select samples with 100% black (K device value == 1)
    $rows = $chart->ramp(sub {$_[0] == $_[1] && $_[1] == $_[2] && $_[3] == 0}); # select samples where C == M == Y and K == 0
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, [1 ..100]); # select paper white samples from sample subset
    $rows = $chart->ramp($code_ref, {'context' => 'Target'}); # specify device context

range

This method returns a row slice of samples selected by a subroutine. For each sample, L*a*b* values are passed to this subroutine, which returns 'true' to select that sample. The subroutine is supplied as a code reference. The chart must have L*a*b* values.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref);
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, $source_rows);
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, $source_rows, $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt');

    $code_ref = sub {abs($_[1]) < 0.5 && abs($_[2]) < 0.5}; # code block to select near-neutral samples
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref); # select near-neutral samples
    $rows = $chart->range(sub {abs($_[1]) < 0.5 && abs($_[2]) < 0.5}); # same as above
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, [800 .. 1000]); # select neutral samples from sample subset
    $rows = $chart->range($code_ref, {'context' => 'Target'}); # specify L*a*b* context

select_token

This method returns a row slice of samples based on a list of tokens.

Samples are selected using device values, as with the 'ramp' method. Commonly used selection criterion are represented by tokens. Tokens may be joined as a text string. Each token generates a selection of samples, which are combined into a single list, with duplicates removed. Some tokens have parameters, which are enclosed in parentheses. Tokens may be uppercase or lowercase.

Here is a list of the supported tokens:

    c - cyan ramp
    m - magenta ramp
    y - yellow ramp
    k - black ramp
    cmyk - cyan, magenta, yellow, black ramps
    ramps - all ramps
    ink(1) - ramp(s) by ink channel, cyan is ink(1)
    ink(1, 2, 3) - cyan, magenta, yellow ramps
    ink(1 .. 3) - same, using PERL '..' function

    nok - samples with no black
    acro - achromatic samples

    gamut - cmyk outer gamut

    rt(10) - round-trip black change ≤ 10%
    gray(5) - near-neutral cmy samples, C* (chroma) ≤ 5
    gray(5, 50) - near-neutral cmy samples, C* (chroma) ≤ 5 and L* ≥ 50
    iso(200) - isometric samples (c == m == y, all others 0%), cmy total ink ≤ 200%
    c+m+y(200) - cmy total ink ≤ 200%
    tac(280) - total ink less ≤ 280%

    nr(33) - chart has 33 rows (required when missing from chart)
    rows(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) – rows 1 - 5
    rows(1 .. 5) - same, using PERL '..' function
    cols(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) – columns 1 - 5
    cols(1 .. 5) - same, using PERL '..' function
    rect(1, 4, 3, 7) - rectangular chart area, rows 1 - 4, columns 3 - 7

    sort(1, 2, 3, 4) - sort by cyan, magenta, yellow, black

Usage

    $rows = $chart->select_token($string);
    $rows = $chart->select_token($string, $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Profile;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt');

    $profile = ICC::Profile->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.icc');
    ($A2B1, $B2A1) = $profile->tag(qw(A2B1 B2A1)); # get profile tags

    $rows = $chart->select_token('all'); # get row slice (all samples)
    $rows = $chart->select_token($tokens); # get row slice using a text string

    # examples of token text strings
    $tokens = 'c m y k'; # cmyk ramps
    $tokens = 'c, m, y, k'; # same, commas between tokens are optional
    $tokens = 'cmyk'; # same result, with a single token
    $tokens = 'CMYK'; # same, text is converted to lower case
    $tokens = 'ramps'; # all ink ramps, including spot colors (simulates TVI method)

    $tokens = 'ink(1)'; ink channel 1 ramp (cyan)
    $tokens = 'ink(1, 2, 3)'; ink channels 1, 2, 3 ramps (cyan, magenta, yellow)

    $tokens = 'rows(1)'; # first chart row
    $tokens = 'rows(1, 2, 3)'; # first 3 chart rows
    $tokens = 'rows(1 .. 3)'; # same, using PERL '..' function
    $tokens = 'cols(1)'; # first chart columns
    $tokens = 'cols(1, 2, 3)'; # first 3 chart columns
    $tokens = 'cols(1 .. 3)'; # same, using PERL '..' function
    $tokens = 'nr(33) rows(1 .. 3)'; # same, with number of rows specified

    $tokens = 'rect(1, 3, 4, 7)'; # rectangular chart area, rows 1 - 3, columns 4 - 7

    # examples using the rt() token, requires A2B and B2A tags
    $tokens = 'rt(10)'; # samples with round-trip black change ≤ 10%
    $tokens = 'rt(10) k'; # same, plus black ramp (OPTIMAL method default)
    $hash = {'A2B' => $A2B1, 'B2A' => $B2A1}; # 'rt()' requires forward and reverse tags
    $rows = $chart->select_token($tokens, $hash); # get row slice

    # examples using the gray() token, requires A2B tag
    $tokens = 'gray(2)'; # near-neutral cmy samples with C* ≤ 2
    $tokens = 'gray(2, 50)'; # same, with with C* ≤ 2 and L* ≥ 50
    $tokens = 'gray(2, 50) k'; # same, plus black ramp (simulates G7 method)
    $hash = {'A2B' => $A2B1}; # 'gray()' requires forward tag
    $rows = $chart->select_token($tokens, $hash); # get row slice

    # examples using the sort token
    $tokens = 'cmyk sort(1, 2, 3, 4); sort the samples by c, m, y, k values (increasing)
    $tokens = 'cmyk sort(4, 3, 2, 1); sort the samples by k, y, m, c values (increasing)
    $tokens = 'cmyk sort(-1, -2, -3, -4); sort the samples by c, m, y, k values (decreasing)
    $tokens = 'cmyk sort(4); sort the samples k value only (increasing)

select_matrix

This method returns a row-matrix from row and column coordinate parameters. The row-matrix selects (crops) a rectangular area of the chart.

A data set, which is a one dimensional list of samples, is mapped to a two-dimensional chart. The first sample is placed in the upper-left corner of the chart. The following samples are placed in this column from top to bottom. The height of the chart is called the row length (although it is really the length of the columns). When a column is filled, the next sample is placed at the top of a new column to the right.

The row-matrix is a Math::Matrix object (a 2-D array structure) containing sample indices of a chart. The matrix is transposed, with the rows of the matrix representing the physical columns described above. This allows the row-matrix to be used as a row slice parameter in most methods. Row slices are flattened by a function which joins the rows together into a one-dimensional list.

The object may contain the row length as a keyword. Otherwise, a default value will be used. The row length may be specified as a parameter, which takes precedence over the object value. When the method is called without parameters, a row-matrix of the entire chart is returned. If row and column indices are specified, the chart will be cropped to include these rows and columns. The row and column indices are one-based, i.e. the upper left sample is row 1, column 1.

The row-matrix can be rotated ("rotate"), flipped ("flip"), or randomized ("randomize").

Usage

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix();
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($row_length);
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($upper_row_index, $lower_row_index, $left_column_index, $right_column_index); (see note 1)
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix($upper_row_index, $lower_row_index, $left_column_index, $right_column_index, $row_length); (see note 1)

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # chart contains 33 rows and 49 columns

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(); # select the entire chart, row length = 33 (33 x 49 chart)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/full_chart.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(21); # select the entire chart, row length = 21, (21 x 77 chart)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/full_chart_21.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(1, 5, 1, 5); # select 5 x 5 matrix (from 33 x 49 chart)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/full_chart_5x5.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(1, 5, 1, 5, 21); # select 5 x 5 matrix (from 21 x 77 chart)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/full_chart_5x5A.txt', $mat);
  1. Indices are one-based, with origin at the upper left

select_template

This method returns a row-matrix containing samples with the same device values as a template chart.

See 'select_matrix' for an explanation of the row-matrix structure.

Samples are selected using device values. Chart and template objects must have device data with the same number of channels. If the exact device values of the template are not found in the object, the sample with the smallest device value error is used. The device value error is computed as a root-mean-square value.

The chart may contain duplicate samples having the same device values. The dups parameter determines how these duplicates will be handled. The rows parameter sets the number of elements in each matrix row. The context parameter sets the device context of the chart object. The template_context parameter sets the device context of the template object.

The default dups behavior is to average duplicate samples. The default rows is taken from various possible sources within the data.

This method will also copy selected values (after averaging, etc.) to the template chart. The behavior is enabled by the copy parameter, whose value is the column slice to be copied.

Usage

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template);
    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, $hash);
    ($mat, $sid) = $chart->select_template($template);
    ($mat, $sid) = $chart->select_template($template, $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/random_data.txt');
    $template = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/IT8.7-4V.txt');

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template); # use default parameters
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'dups' => 1}); # set duplicate handling (see note 1)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_FIFO_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'dups' => 1, 'method' => 'SIMPLE'}); # use simple averaging of L*a*b* and density
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_FIFO_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'rows' => 33}); # set row length
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_33_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'context' => 'Target'}); # set object context
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_OC_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'template_context' => 'Target'}); # set template context
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_TC_data.txt', $mat);

    $mat = $chart->select_template($template, {'copy' => $chart->spectral()}); # set copy column slice (see note 2)
    $template->write('~/Desktop/IT874_data.txt');

    ($mat, $sid) = $chart->select_template($template); # get optional sid row-matrix (see note 3)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/IT874_data.txt', $mat, {'sid' => $sid}); # write file using template sid values
  1. Supported values: 0 - sample average (default), 1 - FIFO, 2 - LIFO, 3 - first sample, 4 - last sample

  2. The copy parameter specifies a column slice which is copied to the template. Columns with the same field names and contexts are added to the template. If the device values differ, the object device values are also copied to the template.

  3. The optional sid row-matrix contains the SAMPLE_ID values of the template. If the template has no SAMPLE_ID field, the sid row-matrix is undefined.

randomize

This method returns a randomly shuffled row slice.

Usage

    $rows = $chart->randomize();
    $rows = $chart->randomize($rows);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt');

    $rows = $chart->randomize(); # returns random slice containing all rows (1 - 1617)
    $rows = $chart->randomize([1 .. 100]); # returns random slice of first hundred rows

analyze

This method returns a structure describing the occurrence of device values within a chart. The structure is a reference to a 2-D array (matrix) with each row corresponding to a device channel. The first column is a hash whose keys are device values (in that channel), and whose values are row slices of the samples with that device value. The second column is an array of the device values, sorted by the number of samples, largest to smallest. The third column is a row slice of a ramp for that device channel, sorted by device value, smallest to largest.

Usage

    $struct = $chart->anaylze();
    $struct = $chart->anaylze($rows);
    $struct = $chart->anaylze($rows, $hash);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CMYK chart
    $chart2 = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/RGB_printer.txt'); # RGB chart

    $struct = $chart->analyze(); # average any duplicate samples (see note 1)
    $rows = $struct->[3][0]{0}; # get row slice of samples with K == 0
    $rows = $struct->[3][0]{0.0}; # same as above
    $rows = $struct->[3][0]{'0'}; # same as above
    $rows = $struct->[3][0]{'0.0'}; # returns undef (see note 2)
    $dev = $struct->[3][1]; # get list of black channel device values
    $rows = $struct->[3][2]; # get row slice for black channel ramp
    $struct = $chart->analyze([1 .. 100]); # analyze the first hundred samples
    $struct = $chart->analyze({'dups' => 1}); # don't average duplicate samples (see note 3)
    $struct = $chart->analyze({'context' => 'Target'}); # set device context
    $struct = $chart2->analyze({'ramp' => 1}); #  (see note 4)
    $struct = $chart2->analyze({'method' => 'SIMPLE'}); # use simple averaging for L*a*b* and density
  1. If there are duplicate samples (samples with the same device values), a corresponding average sample is appended to the chart. That sample index replaces the measured sample indices in the structure (see note 3).

  2. The key is the string equivalent of the numeric device value, in this case '0'.

  3. In this mode, duplicate sample indices are grouped within anonymous arrays, and saved in the structure (see note 1).

  4. An RGB ramp will normally run from black to red, green or blue, which is the proper result for an additive device. For a subtractive device, such as an RGB printer, you may want the ramp to run from paper white to cyan, magenta or yellow. This is accomplished by setting the 'ramp' value to 1. The sort order is not changed by this setting, so the subtractive RGB ramp will run from cyan, magenta or yellow to white.

Reading and writing

The new method reads various file types (CGATS ASCII, CxF3, ASE, TIFF) to create an object.

The following methods write a chart to various file types.

write

This method writes a chart to CGATS ASCII format (see CGATS.17 and ISO 28178).

Usage

    $chart->write($file_path, [$hash]);
    $chart->write($file_path, $rows, [$hash]);
    $chart->write($file_path, $rows, $cols, [$hash]);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CGATS ASCII format
    $chart2 = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.mxf'); # CxF3 format

    $chart->write('~/Desktop/entire_chart.txt'); # writes the entire chart - all rows and columns (see note 1)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/first_rows.txt', [1 .. 10]); # writes first ten rows, all columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/first_columns.txt', [], [0 .. 5]); # writes all rows, first six columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/first_rows_columns.txt', [1 .. 10], [0 .. 5]); # writes first ten rows, first six columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/Lab_columns.txt', [], $chart->lab()); # writes L*a*b* columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/id_cmyk_columns.txt', [], [$chart->id(), $chart->cmyk()]); # writes SAMPLE_ID and CMYK columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/XYZ_columns.txt', [], $chart->cols(qw(XYZ_X XYZ_Y XYZ_Z))); # writes XYZ columns
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/matrix.txt', $chart->select_matrix(5, 10, 5, 10)); # writes a 6 x 6 matrix
    $chart2->write('~/Desktop/entire_chart2.txt'); # writes the entire chart (see note 2)

    $cols = $chart2->xyz({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # get column slice with specific context
    $chart2->write('~/Desktop/context.txt', [], $cols); # write XYZ columns with specific context (see note 2)

    $chart->write('~/Desktop/chart.txt', [], {'undef' => 0}); # undefined data values are replaced by 0 (see note 3)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/chart.txt', [], {'null' => 'unknown'}); # null string data values are replaced by 'unknown' (see note 3)

    $chart->write('~/Desktop/external_sid1.txt', [], $chart->cmyk(), {'sid' => 'row'}); # add SAMPLE_ID field using row number (see note 4)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/external_sid2.txt', [], $chart->cmyk(), {'sid' => $sid}); # add SAMPLE_ID field using sid slice (see note 5)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/external_sid3.txt', [], {'sid' => $sid}); # add SAMPLE_ID field using slice (see note 6)

    $mat = $chart->select_matrix->rotate(1); # get rotation matrix
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/external_sid4.txt', $mat, $chart->cmyk(), {'sid' => $mat}); # add SAMPLE_ID field when rotating (see note 7)
  1. The first sample row is row 1 (row 0 contains the DATA_FORMAT field names).

  2. The context prefix is stripped from the DATA_FORMAT field names.

  3. Hash keys are 'undef', 'null', and 'sid'.

    Default value for 'undef' is 'undef'.

    Default value for 'null' is 'null.

  4. A SAMPLE_ID field is inserted at the start of the DATA_FORMAT header and each DATA record. The SAMPLE_ID value is the row number, starting with one.

  5. A SAMPLE_ID field is inserted at the start of the DATA_FORMAT header and each DATA record. The SAMPLE_ID value is the value contained in the flattened sid slice. The slice may be an array or a row-matrix. This is useful when the row slice is a 'select_template' row-matrix, and we want to use the SAMPLE_ID values of the template.

  6. If the column slice contains a SAMPLE_ID field, the sid slice values are used, rather than the data array values, and no SAMPLE_ID field is inserted.

  7. A SAMPLE_ID field is inserted at the start of the DATA_FORMAT header and each DATA record. The SAMPLE_ID value is the value contained in the flattened rotation matrix, which is the row in the data array.

writeCxF3

This method writes a chart to CxF3 format (see Color Exchange Format 3.0 and ISO 17972-1).

Usage

    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path, $rows, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeCxF3($file_path, $rows, $cols, [$hash]);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CGATS ASCII format
    $chart2 = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.mxf'); # CxF3 format

    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/entire_chart.mxf'); # writes the entire chart - all rows and columns (see notes 1 and 2)
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/first_rows.mxf', [1 .. 10]); # writes first ten rows, all columns
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/first_columns.mxf', [], [0 .. 5]); # writes all rows, first six columns (see note 3)
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/first_rows_columns.mxf', [1 .. 10], [0 .. 5]); # writes first ten rows, first six columns
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/Lab_columns.mxf', [], $chart->lab()); # writes L*a*b* columns
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/id_cmyk_columns.mxf', [], [$chart->id(), $chart->cmyk()]); # writes SAMPLE_ID and CMYK columns
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/XYZ_columns.mxf', [], $chart->cols(qw(XYZ_X XYZ_Y XYZ_Z))); # writes XYZ columns (see note 4)
    $chart->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/matrix.mxf', $chart->select_matrix(5, 10, 5, 10)); # writes a 6 x 6 matrix
    $cols = $chart2->xyz({'context' => 'M0_Measurement'}); # get column slice with specific context
    $chart2->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/context.mxf', [], $cols); # write XYZ columns with specific context
    $chart2->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/context.mxf', {'cc:FileInformation' => [qw(MATERIAL)]}); # copy MATERIAL keyword/value to 'FileInformation' structure.
    $chart2->writeCxF3('~/Desktop/context.mxf', {'validate' => 1}); # validate to CxF3 schema
  1. The first sample row is row 1 (row 0 contains the DATA_FORMAT field names).

  2. The ObjectType attribute is set to the context prefix (if present), or is inferred from the from the format fields.

  3. The CxF3 format requires complete groups of data. For example, you can save L*a*b* data, but not L* by itself.

  4. X-Rite i1Profiler does not support XYZ measurement data.

writeASCII

This method writes the data array in ASCII delimited format for Excel, R, MATLAB, etc. The optional hash controls the inclusion of a header line, the field separator, the record separator and the undefined string. The header line contains the DATA_FORMAT field names, with any contexts removed, and is the first line in the file, if included.

Usage

    $chart->writeASCII($file_path, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeASCII($file_path, $rows, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeASCII($file_path, $rows, $cols, [$hash]);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CGATS ASCII format

    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/entire_chart.txt'); # writes the entire chart - all rows and columns (see note 1)
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/first_rows.txt', [1 .. 10]); # writes first ten rows, all columns
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/first_columns.txt', [], [0 .. 5]); # writes all rows, first six columns
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/first_rows_columns.txt', [1 .. 10], [0 .. 5]); # writes first ten rows, first six columns
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/no_header.txt', {'header' => 0}); # omit the header (see notes 2 and 3)
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/comma_delimited.txt', {'sep' => ','}); # use comma for field separator
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/line_feed.txt', {'eol' => "\r\n"}); # use carriage return/line feed for record separator
    $chart->writeASCII('~/Desktop/undef_NA.txt', {'undef' => 'NA'}); # use 'NA' string for undefined data
  1. The first sample row is row 1 (row 0 contains the DATA_FORMAT field names).

  2. The optional hash must be the last parameter.

  3. Hash keys are 'header', 'sep', 'eol', and 'undef'.

    Allowed values for 'header' are 0 (no header), 1 (header with contexts), and 2 (header without contexts).

    Default value for 'header' is 1.

    Default value for 'sep' is the tab character.

    Default value for 'eol' is the line feed character.

    Default value for 'undef' is the null string.

writeTIFF

This method writes a TIFF image file. The samples are selected by the row slice, and the corresponding TIFF patches are arranged as rows and columns. The first sample is in the upper-left corner, and the samples are arranged in column-major order (top to bottom, left to right). The TIFF color space is determined by the first supported field in the column slice. Supported color spaces are RGB, CMYK, nCLR and L*a*b*. RGB files may have alpha channels, identified by the keywords 'RGB_A', 'RGB_A1', RGB_A2', etc. nCLR files are written as CMYK + spot TIFF files, therefore n must be 4 or greater to write as a TIFF.

Usage

    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path, $rows, [$hash]);
    $chart->writeTIFF($file_path, $rows, $cols, [$hash]);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CGATS TR006 standard data set

    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk.tif'); # all samples, CMYK color space, default parameters (see note 1)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_1-10.tif', [1 .. 10]); # samples 1 - 10
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_rotate.tif', $chart->select_matrix->rotate(1)); # all samples, rotated 90 degrees CW
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/lab.tif', [], $chart->lab()); # all samples, color space is L*a*b*
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_2020.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20}); # patch size is 20 px by 20 px (see note 2)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_20203.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'gap' => 3}); # same as above, with 3 px gap (see note 3)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_2020363.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'gap' => 3, 'left' => 6, 'right' => 3}); # same as above, with edges (see note 3)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_20203633.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'gap' => 3, 'left' => 6.3, 'right' => 3}); # same as above, with edge overlap (see note 3)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_8-bit.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'bits' => 8}); # 8-bit data (see note 4)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_dither.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'bits' => 8, 'dither' => 1}); # dithered (see note 5)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_300dpi.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'xres' => 300, 'yres' => 300}); # resolution 300 dpi (see note 6)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_120dpcm.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'xres' => 120, 'yres' => 120, 'unit' => 3}); # resolution 120 dpcm (see note 7)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_32rows.tif', {'width' => 20, 'height' => 20, 'rows' => 32}); # row length is 32 (see note 8)
    $chart->writeTIFF('~/Desktop/cmyk_bigendian.tif', {'endian' => 'big'}); # file is big-endian (see note 9)
  1. Omitting the row and column slices selects all samples and all fields. The first supported field in this file is 'CMYK_C', so the TIFF color space is CMYK.

  2. Patch size is specified by the 'width' and 'height' hash values (in pixels). Default values are 1 pixel.

  3. Gap width is specified by the 'gap' hash value (in pixels). Left and right edge width is specified by the 'left' and 'right' hash values (in pixels). Left and right edge width may also be specified as m.n where m is the width and n is the overlap. Gaps and edges are used by scanning instruments, such as X-Rite's i1Pro2, to locate patch boundaries. Default values are 0 pixels (no gap or edges).

  4. Bits per pixel is specified by the 'bits' hash value. Allowed values are 8, 16 and 32. Default value is 16.

  5. Dithering is enabled by a 'dither' hash value. Dithering is used on 8-bit files to simulate tone values between 8-bit integer values. The value is boolean with a default of 0.

  6. Resolution is specified by the 'xres' and 'yres' hash values. Default values are 72.

  7. Resolution units are specified by the 'unit' hash value. Allowed values are 1 (no absolute unit), 2 (dpi) and 3 (dpcm). Default value is 2 (dpi).

  8. Row length is specified by the 'rows' hash value. Default is taken from the 'LGOROWLENGTH' keyword, or computed to make a square file.

  9. Byte order is specified by the 'endian' hash value. Allowed values are 'big' and 'little'. Default value is the system byte order.

writeASE

This method writes a chart to Adobe Swatch Exchange format, which is used by the Adobe Creative Suite applications.

Usage

    $chart->writeASE($file_path, $rows, $cols);
    $chart->writeASE($file_path, $rows, $cols, $color_type);

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/GRACoL2006_Coated1.txt'); # CGATS ASCII format

    $chart->writeASE('~/Desktop/cmyk_all.ase', [], $chart->cmyk()); # write all samples as CMYK values (see notes 1 and 2)
    $chart->writeASE('~/Desktop/cmyk_10.ase', [1 .. 10], $chart->cmyk()); # write first ten samples
    $chart->writeASE('~/Desktop/Lab_all.ase', [], $chart->lab()); # write all samples as L*a*b* values
    $chart->writeASE('~/Desktop/Lab_all_global.ase', [], $chart->lab(), 0); # swatches are global (see note 3)
  1. Supported color types are CMYK, RGB and L*a*b*. The column slice must be one of these types.

  2. If the chart contains a SAMPLE_NAME field, it will be used as the swatch name. Otherwise, a name is created from the color values, e.g. C=100 M=50 Y=0 K=0. The SAMPLE_NAME field should not be included in the column slice.

  3. The color type may be: 0 - global, 1 - spot, 2 - normal (default)

Math::Matrix additions

These methods are used to manipulate the geometry of a chart in two dimensions. A chart is actually a one-dimensional list of samples, but is commonly treated as a two-dimensional object, having rows and columns of patches. For example, the IT8.7/4 target contains 1617 samples, and is often rendered as a matrix of 33 rows and 49 columns (which perfectly fills the bed of a SpectroScan table).

When a chart is written as a CGATS ASCII file it is a one-dimensional list of samples. When displayed by other software, the samples are arranged sequentially in rows or columns, as a two-dimensional matrix. For instance, the Gretag-Macbeth MeasureTool software starts in the upper LH corner, and displays in columns, from top to bottom, left to right. Other software may use a different convention, for instance, from left to right, top to bottom.

We use a row matrix to represent a set of samples in a two-dimensional arrangement. The row matrix is a Math::Matrix object, and contains row numbers in an array-of-arrays structure. The row matrix may be used as a row slice parameter in most methods, in which case it is flattened to a one-dimensional list. The select_matrix and select_template methods are typically used to create the row matrix.

The methods below will modify the geometry of the row matrix, rotating, flipping and transposing in all possible combinations. In addition, there is a randomize method, which is used to scramble the chart data. These methods return a new row matrix, with the samples rearranged. The methods may be combined, as shown in the examples below.

rotate

Usage

    $mat = $mat->rotate($n); # rotate Math::Matrix object

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(); # make row matrix of the full chart
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_rotated_file.txt', $mat->rotate(1)); # write rotated chart (see note 1)
  1. Parameter values are: 0 = None, 1 = 90° CW, 2 = 180°, 3 = 90° CCW

flip

Usage

    $mat = $mat->flip($n); # flip Math::Matrix object

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(); # make row matrix of the full chart
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_flipped_file.txt', $mat->flip(1)); # write flipped chart (see note 1)
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_rot_flip_file.txt', $mat->rotate(1)->flip(1)); # rotate, then flip
  1. Parameter values are: 0 = transpose, 1 = horizontal, 2 = cross transpose, 3 = vertical

randomize

Usage

    $mat = $mat->randomize($n); # randomize Math::Matrix object

Examples

    use ICC::Support::Chart;

    $chart = ICC::Support::Chart->new('~/Desktop/my_file.txt');
    $mat = $chart->select_matrix(); # make row matrix of the full chart
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_random_file.txt', $mat->randomize()); # write randomized chart
    $chart->write('~/Desktop/my_rot_random_file.txt', $mat->rotate(1)->randomize()); # rotate, then randomize

This randomize method is for Math::Matrix objects. There is another randomize method for ICC::Support::Chart objects in the Selecting data section.

SEE ALSO

ANSI Standards

CGATS.4 Graphic technology - Graphic arts reflection densitometry measurements - Terminology, equations, image elements and procedures

CGATS.5 Graphic technology - Spectral measurement and colorimetric computation for graphic arts images

CGATS.17 Graphic technology - Exchange format for color and process control data using XML or ASCII text

IT8.7/4 Graphic technology - Input data for characterization of 4-color process printing - Expanded data set

ASTM Standards

ASTM D 2244 Standard Practice for Calculation of Color Tolerances and Color Differences from Instrumentally Measured Color Coordinates

ASTM E 308 Standard Practice for Computing the Colors of Objects by Using the CIE System

ASTM E 1708 Standard Practice for Electronic Interchange of Color and Appearance Data

ASTM E 2022 Standard Practice for Calculation of Weighting Factors for Tristimulus Integration

ASTM E 2729 Standard Practice for Rectification of Spectrophotometric Bandpass Differences

CIE Standards

CIE 15 Colorimetry

ISO Standards

ISO 5-3 Photography and graphic technology — Spectral density measurements — Part 3: Spectral conditions

ISO 13655 Graphic technology — Spectral measurement and colorimetric computation for graphic arts images

ISO 15076-1 Image technology colour management — Architecture, profile format and data structure — Part 1: Based on ICC.1:2010

ISO 17972-1 Graphic technology — Colour data exchange format (CxF/X) — Part 1: Relationship to CxF3 (CxF/X-1)

ISO 28178 Graphic technology — Exchange format for colour and process control data using XML or ASCII text

Proprietary Standards

Color Exchange Format 3.0 A standard for exchange of color information (X-Rite)

ICC.1 Image technology colour management — Architecture, profile format, and data structure (ICC)

LICENSE

Programs in this distribution, authored by William B. Birkett, are licensed under the GNU General Public License, v3.

See http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html for license details.

AUTHOR

William B. Birkett, <wbirkett@doplganger.com>

COPYRIGHT

Copyright © 2004-2018 by William B. Birkett

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